An Introduction to Shakespeare's Midsummer Night's Dream (Google eBook)

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W. Pickering, 1841 - 104 pages
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Page 39 - Now the hungry lion roars, And the wolf behowls the moon ; Whilst the heavy ploughman snores, All with weary task fordone. Now the wasted brands do glow, Whilst the screech-owl, screeching loud, Puts the wretch that lies in woe In remembrance of a shroud.
Page 78 - The finch, the sparrow, and the lark, The plain-song cuckoo gray, Whose note full many a man doth mark, And dares not answer, nay...
Page 7 - These are the forgeries of jealousy : And never, since the middle summer's spring, Met we on hill, in dale, forest, or mead, By paved fountain, or by rushy brook, Or in the beached margent of the sea, To dance our ringlets to the whistling wind, But with thy brawls thou hast disturb'd our sport.
Page 2 - If we shadows have offended, Think but this, and all is mended: That you have but slumbered here While these visions did appear. And this weak and idle theme, No more yielding but a dream, Gentles, do not reprehend: If you pardon, we will mend.
Page 93 - WHAT needs my Shakespeare, for his honour'd bones, The labour of an age in piled stones? Or that his hallow'd relics should be hid Under a star-ypointing pyramid? Dear son of memory, great heir of fame, What need'st thou such weak witness of thy name? Thou, in our wonder and astonishment, Hast built thyself a livelong monument.
Page 105 - SMYTH'S (Professor) Lectures on Modern History; from the Irruption of the Northern Nations to the close of the American Revolution.
Page 48 - Dream, which I had never seen before, nor shall ever again, for it is the most insipid ridiculous play that ever I saw in my life.
Page 45 - Another sort there be, that will Be talking of the Fairies still, Nor never can they have their fill, As they were wedded to them; No tales of them their thirst can slake, So much delight therein they take, And some strange thing they fain would make, Knew they the way to do them. Then since no Muse hath been so bold, Or of the later, or the old, Those elvish secrets to unfold, Which lie from others...
Page 69 - Ah me! for aught that ever I could read. Could ever hear by tale or history, The course of true love never did run smooth: But, either it was different in blood; Her.
Page 113 - Testament!,' with 90 wood-cuts beautifully engraved. Crown 8vo. II. Is. A few copies printed entirety on India paper, 21. 2s. THE DANCE OF DEATH, exhibited in fifty-five elegant Engravings on Wood, with a Dissertation on the several Representations of that Subject; more particularly on those attributed to MACABER and HOLBEIN, by FRANCIS DOUCE, FSA 8vo.

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