THE DUBLIN JOURNAL OF MEDICAL SCIENCE (Google eBook)

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1878
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Page 361 - Any house or part of a house so overcrowded as to be dangerous or injurious to the health of the inmates, whether or not members of the same family : NUISANCES continued.
Page 8 - There is a small Island in Lancashire called the pile of Foulders, wherein are found the broken pieces of old and bruised ships, some whereof have been cast thither by Shipwracke, and also the trunks and bodies with the branches of old and rotten trees cast up there likewise ; whereon is found a certain spume or froth that in time breedeth...
Page 361 - For the purposes of this act, 1. any premises in such a state as to be a nuisance or injurious to health; 2.
Page 8 - ... to the shape and form of a bird. When it is perfectly formed the shell gapeth open, and the first thing that appeareth is the...
Page 361 - Any fireplace or furnace which does not as far as practicable consume the smoke arising from the combustible used therein, and which is used for working engines by steam, or in any mill, factory, dyehouse, brewery, bakehouse, or gaswork, or in any manufacturing or trade process whatsoever; and Any chimney (not being the chimney of a private dwelling-house) sending forth black smoke in such quantity as to be a nuisance, shall be deemed to be nuisances liable to be dealt with summarily in manner provided...
Page 8 - ... as it groweth greater, it openeth the shell by degrees, till at length it is all come forth, and hangeth only by the bill. In short space after it cometh to full maturity, and falleth into the sea, where it gathereth feathers...
Page 361 - Any factory, workshop, or work-place, not already under the operation of any general Act for the regulation of factories or bakehouses, not kept in a cleanly state, or not ventilated in such a manner as to render harmless, as far as practicable, any gases, vapours, dust, or other impurities generated in the course of the work carried on therein, that are a nuisance, or injurious, or dangerous to health, or so overcrowded while work is carried on as to be dangerous or prejudicial to the health of...
Page 8 - There are found in the north parts of Scotland, and the islands adjacent, called Orchades, certain trees whereon do grow certain shells of a white colour, tending to russet, wherein are contained little living creatures; which shells, in time of maturity, do open, and out of them grow those little living things, which, falling into the water, do become fowls, which we call Barnacles...
Page 106 - The facts and considerations we have had before us are, I think, sufficient to justify the definitive rejection of the first hypothesis in all its forms; for, on the one hand, we have seen that no disorder of the systemic functions or of the nervous centres which preside over them is capable of inducing a state which can be identified with febrile pyrexia; and on the other, that it is possible for such a state to originate and persist in the organism after the influence of the central nervous system...
Page 8 - ... finely woven as it were together, of a whitish colour, one end whereof is fastened unto the inside of the shell, even as the fish of...

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