Notes and Queries (Google eBook)

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Oxford University Press, 1880 - Questions and answers
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Page 385 - Behold, I give unto you power to tread on serpents and scorpions, and over all the power of the enemy: and nothing shall by any means hurt you.
Page 43 - I played a soft and doleful air, I sang an old and moving story An old rude song that suited well That ruin wild and hoary. She listened with a flitting blush, With downcast eyes and modest grace ; For well she knew I could not choose But gaze upon her face.
Page 184 - It is a pleasure to stand upon the shore and to see ships tossed upon the sea; a pleasure to stand in the window of a castle and to see a battle and the adventures thereof below; but no pleasure is comparable to the standing upon the vantage ground of truth (a hill not to be commanded, and where the air is always clear and serene), and to see the errors and wanderings and mists and tempests in the vale below; so always that this prospect be with pity, and not with swelling or pride.
Page 245 - Sleep is a death, O make me try, By sleeping, what it is to die; And as gently lay my head On my grave, as now my bed.
Page 209 - Warwick in blood did wade, Oxford the foe invade, And cruel slaughter made Still as they ran up: Suffolk his axe did ply, Beaumont and Willoughby Bare them right doughtily, Ferrers and Fanhope. Upon Saint Crispin's day...
Page 122 - Though thy beginning was small, Yet thy latter end should greatly increase. For inquire, I pray thee, of the former age, And prepare thyself to the search of their fathers...
Page 209 - With Spanish yew so strong, Arrows a cloth-yard long, That like to serpents stung, Piercing the weather; None from his fellow starts, But playing manly parts, And like true English hearts, Stuck close together.
Page 43 - That sometimes from the savage den, And sometimes from the darksome shade, And sometimes starting up at once In green and sunny glade, There came and looked him in the face An angel beautiful and bright...
Page 151 - THE Psalter shall be read through once every month, as it is there appointed, both for Morning and Evening Prayer. But in February it shall be read only to the twenty-eighth or twenty-ninth Day of the Month. And whereas January, March, 'May, July, August, October, and December, have...
Page 245 - Teach me to live, that I may dread The grave as little as my bed ; Teach me to die, that so I may Rise glorious at the awful day.

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