A Nation-state by Construction: Dynamics of Modern Chinese Nationalism

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Stanford University Press, 2004 - History - 355 pages
2 Reviews
This is the first historically comprehensive, up-to-date analysis of the causes, content, and consequences of nationalism in China, an ancient empire that has struggled to construct a nation-state and find its place in the modern world. It shows how Chinese political elites have competed to promote different types of nationalism linked to their political values and interests and imposed them on the nation while trying to repress other types of nationalism. In particular, the book reveals how leaders of the PRC have adopted a pragmatic strategy to use nationalism while struggling to prevent it from turning into a menace rather than a prop.

  

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Contents

The Rise of Chinese Nationalism Causes Content and International Ramifications
8
The Origins of Chinese Nationalism Western Challenge Chinese Tradition Ethnicity and the State
37
Building a Chinese NationState Elite Nationalism versus Mass Nationalism
79
The Challenge of Chinese Liberal Nationalism Personal versus National Rights
120
The Challenge of Ethnic Nationalism Selfdetermination versus the Unitary Chinese NationState
165
The Rise of StateLed Pragmatic Nationalism An Instrumental Response to the Decline of Communism in China
209
The International Orientations of Chinese Nationalism InwardDirected Sentiments or OutwardDirected Emotions
248
Notes
291
Bibliography
313
Sources in English
333
Index
353
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About the author (2004)

Suisheng Zhao is Associate Professor at the University of Denver's Graduate School of International Studies, and Executive Director of its Center for China-U.S. Cooperation. He is the founder and editor of the Journal of Contemporary China and has authored and edited five books.

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