Mandarin Chinese: A Functional Reference Grammar

Front Cover
University of California Press, 1989 - Foreign Language Study - 691 pages
6 Reviews
This reference grammar provides, for the first time, a description of the grammar of Mandarin Chinese, the official spoken language of China and Taiwan, in functional terms, focusing on the role and meanings of word-level and sentence-level structures in actual conversations.
  

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does anybody know if they have that for beginner; not just English & how to pronounce but also include Chinese characters?
Or does somebody know if there are good books the include everything: English translation & pronunciation with the Chinese phase & characters? thanks

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a great book for students (intermediate or above), teachers and linguists as a reference book. I studied linguistics and used it in my BA, MA and even now when applying my PhD. It's a golden handbook, even though it's written many years ago and many points mentioned in the book have been further studied or questioned. Many papers about Chinese acquisitions or linguistics have referenced to this book. Definitely an influential piece for Modern Chinese linguistics. 

Contents

Introduction
1
Typological Description
10
Word Structure
28
Simple Declarative Sentences
85
Auxiliary Verbs
172
Aspect
184
SentenceFinal Particles
238
Adverbs
319
The bd Construction
463
The Mi Construction
492
Presentative Sentences
509
Questions
520
Comparison
564
Nominalization
575
Serial Verb Constructions
594
The Complex Stative Construction
623

CoverbsPrepositions
355
Indirect Objects and Benefactives
370
Locative and Directional Phrases
390
Negation
415
Verb Copying
442
The Imperative
451
Sentence Linking
631
Pronouns in Discourse
657
References
677
Index
683
Copyright

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References to this book

A-Morphous Morphology

Limited preview - 1992
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About the author (1989)

Charles N. Li is Professor of Linguistics and Chairperson, Linguistics Department, University of California, Santa Barbara. Sandra A. Thompson is Professor of Linguistics, University of California, Santa Barbara.

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