Joseph Dennie: Editor of "The Port Folio" and Author of "The Lay Preacher". (Google eBook)

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J. Wilson and son, 1880 - 41 pages
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Page 37 - And as first editor of the Port Folio, He contributed to chasten the morals, and to Refine the taste of this nation. To an imagination lively, not licentious, A wit sportive, not wanton, And a heart without guile, he United a deep sensibility, which endeared Him to his friends, and an ardent piety, Which we humbly trust recommended him to his God.
Page 30 - May, he came into the office, dressed in a pea-green coat, white vest, nankin small-clothes, white silk stockings, and shoes, or pumps, fastened with silver buckles, which covered at least half the foot from the instep to the toe.
Page 40 - Burns with her step, yet man regards it not. She whispers round, her words are in the air, But lost, unheard, they linger freezing there,* Without one breath of soul, divinely strong, One ray of mind to thaw them into song.
Page 26 - ... vagabond like George Primrose, I sat out one evening for this place, without the merit or the consolation of being a philosophic adventurer like him. On the road I formed that plan which I have since realized, and which has attached some success. There was a press here conducted by a young man, honest, industrious, and then a partner of Thomas. I determined, by the agency of my pen, to convince him that I could be useful, and then — my humble knowledge of human agency taught me — I was sure...
Page 30 - Being the younger apprentice, — in vulgar phrase, the printer's devil, — it was my lot to call upon him for copy, and carry the proof to him. Thus, for seven or eight months, my intercourse with him was almost daily, and was as familiar as propriety would sanction between an editor and an apprentice. I never saw him otherwise than in good humor. "Dennie wrote with great rapidity, and generally postponed his task until he was called upon for copy.
Page 31 - Dennie wrote with great rapidity, and generally postponed his task until he was called upon for copy. It was frequently necessary to go to his office, and it was not uncommon to find him in bed at a late hour in the morning. His copy was often given out in small portions, a paragraph or two at a time; sometimes it was written in the printing-office, while the compositor was waiting to put it in type. One of the best of his lay sermons was written at the village tavern, directly opposite to the office,...
Page 15 - May Mr. Burroughs carried me up to an exceeding high mountain and showed me all the kingdoms of the earth and told me that he would give them all to me if I would write in his book...
Page 30 - He had just emerged from the barber's shop. His hair, in front, was well loaded with pomatum, frizzled, or craped, and powdered ; the ear-locks had undergone the same process ; behind, his natural hair was augmented by the addition of a large queue (called,-vulgarly, the false tail), which, enrolled in some yards of black ribbon, reached half-way down his back.
Page 37 - ... adorn the Senate, and the Bar, But following the impulse of a Genius, Formed for converse with the Muses, He devoted his life to the Literature of his Country. As author of the Lay Preacher...
Page 30 - His hair, in front, was well loaded with pomatum, frizzled, or craped, and powdered ; the ear-locks had undergone the same process; behind, his natural hair was augmented by the addition of a large queue (called, vulgarly, the false tail), which, enrolled in some yards of black ribbon, reached halfway down his back. Thus accommodated, the Lay Preacher stands before my mind's eye, as lifelike and sprightly as if it were but yesterday that I saw the reality. "Among his familiar acquaintance, and in...

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