History of Alabama and Dictionary of Alabama Biography, Volume 3 (Google eBook)

Front Cover
S. J. Clarke publishing Company, 1921 - Alabama - 716 pages
2 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

So nice to see my dad, Roswell Fiske Brown, and his daddy and family in this book. Robert Leland Brown was my grandad on my dad's side. I knew a lot about what he did but found out even more reading this wonderful book. Grandpa's wife, Caroline, was Henrietta Swan Leavitt's sister. Henrietta discovered how to measure the Universe, Leavitt's Law. She used to show my dad the constellations when she visited Alabama. Dad was so influenced by her that he became one of the very top illustrators for Popular Mechanics, World Book, Britannica and many more. He invented the Strato Rocket, which was basically the first Space Shuttle. He knew perspective like no one else. He did cutaways of boats so you could see inside the portion of the boat which was under water. He illustrated boats with rockets launching, rockets in the sky, vehicles which could land on other planets and much much more. He loved to invent aerodynamically perfect paper airplanes which would glide forever. He invented a 3D camera set up with Brownie Starflash cameras and a viewer. He made super long periscopes and sent me out in the neighborhood to play with them. He was always shooting off little rockets he made using CO2 cartridges, which he used often, and we would watch them go through the sky, and then he sent me out to find where they landed. He invented numerous kites; Rotary, Flat and mimicked a realistic Seagull. Daddy also faked a Goodyear Blimp by suspending a model he made of it hanging from one of his kites so it looked real. People thought the Goodyear Blimp was up in the sky! He was always inventing something new daily. Such discipline and such a sweet man.
I also enjoyed seeing the correct birthdate of Grandpa Brown, and some of my genealogy, including my dad's siblings. Dorothy died at about 14 years and i was born on her birthday and looked like her so kind of hard for my dad and his brother Bob and my very dear, sweet, wonderful Aunt Louise. Dorothy wrote an amazing story about canaries from the perspective of her being a canary that got caught by a man in the Canary Islands, and put in a cage. She wrote that her mother had warned her not to go near the man, but she did anyway and as a result, she made the best of things caged up instead of free.
The entire family was quite amazing. Only i remain.
 

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

well what can i sayy roll tide but anyways this is my great great great aunt

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 240 - Indians in Florida. He resigned from the army Feb. 16. 1856, having been appointed to the chair of chemistry, mineralogy and geology in the University of Mississippi, where he remained until 1861, when he was re-appointed to the United States army as captain in the...
Page 155 - Argument on Fugitive Slave Case" (1837); "Letter to F. H. Elmore" (1838); "Report on the duty of Political Action" (1839); "Political Obligations of Abolitionists" (1839); "American Churches the Bulwarks of American Slavery" (1840); "Speeches in England "(1840) ; " Examination of the Decision of the United States Supreme Court in the Case of Strader et al v. Graham" (1850), besides magazine and newspaper contributions. Four of his sons and one grandson served as soldiers throughout the civil war,...
Page 561 - The correspondence which I am obliged to have with the English, who write to me from all parts, and particularly with the Governor of Mobile, gives me serious occupation. This governor is an extraordinary man. As he knows that I speak English, he occasionally writes to me in verse. He speaks to me of Francis I. and Charles V. He compares Pontiak, an Indian chief, to Mithridates ; he says that he goes to bed with Montesquieu. When there occur some petty difficulties between the inhabitants of New...
Page 141 - January 5, 1833, under act of Congress of June 7, 1832, payment to date from March 4, 1831; annual allowance, $36.66; sums received to date of publication of list, $91.65. Revolutionary Pension Roll, in vol. xiv, Sen. doc. 513, 23rd Cong., 1st sess., 1833-34.
Page 372 - November 15, 1833. under act of Congress of June 7. 1832; payment to date from March 4, 1831; annual allowance, $30; sums received to date of publication of list, $90. Revolutionary Pension Roll, in Vol. xiv, Sen. Doc. 514, 23rd Cong., 1st sess., 1833-34.
Page 339 - March 15, 1833 under act of Congress of June 7. 1832, payment to date from March 4, 1831; annual allowance, $100; sums received to date of publication of list, $200. Revolutionary Pension Roll, in Vol. xiv., Sen. Doc. 514, 23rd Cong., 1st sess., 1833-34.
Page 235 - Louis in 1866, where he was admitted to the bar, and began the practice of law in 1867; became commander St.
Page 232 - Macon, from which date he has actively continued the same both in the State and Federal courts; was frequently a member of State Democratic conventions; was president of the State Democratic convention in 1880, and was delegate from the State at large to the national Democratic convention in Chicago in 1884; in 1868 he was elected Presidential elector (Seymour and Blair) on the Democratic ticket; in 1871 was elected to the Georgia house of representatives, of which body he...
Page 116 - September 29, 1833, under act of Congress of June 7, 1832; payment to date from March 4, 1831; annual allowance. $80; sums received to date of publication of list, $240 Revolutionary Pension Roll, in vol. xiv. Sen. doc. 514. 23rd Cong., 1st sess., 1833-34.
Page 415 - To my compatriot in arms, and old and intimate friend, Dr. Craik, I give my bureau (or, as the cabinet-makers call it, tambour secretary) and the circular chair, an appendage of my study.

Bibliographic information