Queen Elizabeth and her times, original letters selected from the private correspondence of Burghley [and others ed.] by T. Wright (Google eBook)

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1838
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Contents

Sir Nicholas White to Lord Burghley
13
Sir Henry Wallop to the Earl of Leicester Dublin March
15
Sir Thomas Smith to Lord Burghley
18
The same to the same Hampton Court Feb
20
Sir Edward Waterhouse to Lord Burghley
24
Jan
26
Randolph and Bowes to the two Secretaries Edinburgh Feb
28
Windsor Dec 4
29
Lord Burghley to the Earl of Shrewsbury
30
Recorder Fletewood to Lord Burghley
36
Sir John Hawkins to Lord Burghley
43
Robert Bowes to Lord Burghley
46
Marocco June 11
56
vm
58
Bacon House July 30
65
Page
71
Sir Edward Fitton to Lord Burghley
72
Lord Hunsdon to Lord Burghley
91
Sir Francis Walsingham to Sir Christopher Hatton
93
Sir Christopher Hatton to Lord Burghley
98
St Catherines May 31 1580
109
Sir F Walsingham to Lord Burghley
115
Sir Richard Bingham to the Earl of Leicester
116
Queen Elizabeth to the King of Scots
122
Thomas Norton to Sir Christopher Hatton
123
Francis Mylles to Randolph
129
W Davison to Sir F Walsingham
133
Mr Wotton to Sir F Walsingham
139
The same to the same July 10
142
Thomas Doyley to the Earl of Leicester
145
Sir Francis Walsingham to the Earl of Sussex Paris Aug 20 1581
148
Sir Walter Raleigh to the Earl of Leicester
149
Sir Francis Knollys to Burghley and Leicester London Sept 29
154
Recorder Fletewood to Sir F Walsingham
161
Thomas Norton to Sir Christopher Hatton London Feb 28
167
The Court April 20
170
The same to the same May 6
173
Edward Prinne to Lord Burghley
179
Sir Francis Walsingham to Lord Burghley
203
Flushing Sept 13
210
The same to the same
232
Lord North to Lord Burghley
238
Sir Thomas Heneage to Lord Burghley The Court Sept 23
249
Sir Robert Cecil to Michael Hickes
255
Sir Martin Frobisher to the Council
261

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Page 455 - Majestie's commandment ; and no wise contrary the same, presuming that she being God's chief minister here, it shall be God's will to have her commandments obeyed, after that I have performed my duty as a counsellor, and shall in my hart wish her commandments to have such good successes, as I am sure she intendeth.
Page 15 - a learned man and a good antiquary, but of a marvelous merry and pleasant conceit." He often appears in this latter character in his letters, which give us a most interesting picture of London as it was in the days of " good Queen Bess." Fletewood died at his house in Noble street, Aldersgate, on the 28th of February, 159*.
Page 47 - It is incredible how quickly he wrought himself through the notice into the favour, through the court into the chamber, yea closet, yea bosom of Pope Pius Quintus; so that some wise men thought his Holiness did forfeit a parcel of his infallibility in giving credit to such a glorioso, vaunting that with three thousand soldiers he would beat all the English out of Ireland.
Page 486 - I (ever) may be weaned to feed myself, I shall be more ready to serve her on the earth : if not, I hope to be, in heaven, a servitor for her and God's church. " And so I thank you for your partridges.
Page 206 - I doubt they will not so trinmph at the day of judgment. Thus, most humbly craving your Lordship's blessing, I commit the same and my Lady to Almighty God. At Paris, this 26th of August. Your Lordship's most obedient son, W. CECILL. SIR J.
Page 486 - Majesty understand how her singular kindness doth overcome my power to acquit it who, though she will not be a mother, yet she showed herself by feeding me, with her own princely hand, as a careful nurse. And if I may be weaned to feed myself I shall be more ready to serve her on the earth. If not, I hope to be in heaven a servitor for her and God's church.
Page 186 - Lo! you may see how a nobleman's son can use himself, and how he putteth off his cap to poor men: our Lord bless him.' This passage the recorder wrote in a letter to his father, adding, 'Your lordship hath cause to thank God for so virtuous a child.
Page 111 - ... left or friended, or at their own free election, or forsaking likely success in other studies of more delight and no less preferment, or setting hand thereunto early without waste of years; upon such survey made, it may be my case may not seem ordinary, no more than my suit, and so more beseeming unto it. As I force myself to say this in excuse of my motion, lest it should...
Page 73 - Majestie woll persiste in myslyking of safe counsayle ? Nay, who woll not rather shrynkingly (that I may say no worse) play the partes of King Richard the Second's men, then to enter into the odious office of crossing of her Majestie's wylle...
Page 225 - Weddensdaye, one Browne, a serving man in a blew coat, a shifting fellowe, having a perilous wit of his owne, intending a spoil if he could have brought it to passe, did at the theatre-doore quarrell with certayn poore boyes, handicraft prentizes, and strooke some of them ; and lastlie, he, with his sword, wounded and maymed one of the boyes upon the left hand. Whereupon there assembled near a thousand people. This Browne did very cunningly conveye himself 228 FRAYS IN LONDON.

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