Transactions of the Asiatic Society of Japan, Volumes 4-5 (Google eBook)

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The Society, 1888 - Japan
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Page 36 - Tan aha, [Cinnabar] is subjected to heat, it produces mercury. After passing through other changes, it returns to its original form. It differs widely, therefore, from vegetable substances, and hence it has the power of making men live for ever, and raising them to the rank of the genii. He who knows this doctrine, is he not far above common men? In the world there are few that know it, and many that cavil at it. Many do not even know that mercury comes out of cinnabar. When told, they still refuse...
Page 112 - Bune, and because they found no inhabitants upon it they marked it with the character of an uninhabited island. On the shores they found an incredible quantity of fish and crabs, some of which were from four to six feet long.
Page 192 - There is every reason to consider it established, that an earthquake is simply " the transit of a wave or waves of elastic compression in any direction, from vertically upwards to horizontally in any azimuth, through the crust and surface of the earth, from any centre of impulse or from more than one, and which may be attended with sound and tidal waves, dependent upon the impulse and upon circumstances of position as to sea and land.
Page 215 - Vice-President, in the chair. The minutes of last meeting were read and approved. The Council acknowledged a contribution from Professor Perry " On Steam," and the Library Committee reported receipt of the Proceedings of several learned Societies.
Page 112 - Hachijo, from which they computed it to " be 300 miles distant towards the East. They met with no " inhabitants, but found it to be a very pleasant and fruitful " country, well supplied with fresh water and furnished with " plenty of plants and trees, particularly the...
Page 134 - ... our atmosphere being a non-conductor, and the rarer and rarer air above us being a non-conductor, and the so-called vacuous space, or the inter-planetary space beyond that (which we cannot admit to be really vacuous), being a non-conductor also, then a charge could be given to the earth as a whole, if there were the other body to come and go away again, just as a charge could be given to a pithball electrified in the air of this room.
Page 36 - ... that mercury comes out of cinnabar. When told, they still refuse to believe it, saying that cinnabar is red, and how can it produce a white substance? They say also that cinnabar is a stone, that stones when heated turn to ashes, and how then can anything else be expected of cinnabar? They cannot even reach this simple truth, much less can it be said of them, that they have been instructed in the doctrine of the genii.
Page 131 - THE IMPORTANCE OF A GENERAL SYSTEM OF SIMULTANEOUS OBSERVATIONS OF ATMOSPHERIC ELECTRICITY. By WE AYRTON and JOHN PERRY, Professors in the Imperial College of Engineering, Tokio, Japan. Read before the Asiatic Society of Japan on the 25th April, 1877. The great practical value of simultaneous meteorological observations is the assistance they afford us in enabling fairly accurate predictions of the weather to be made some hours in advance. It is unnecessary for us to enter fully into what is being...
Page 134 - ... the so-called vacuous space, or the interplanetary space beyond that (which we cannot admit to be really vacuous), being a non-conductor also, then a charge could be given to the earth as a whole, if there were the other body to come and go away again, just as a charge could be given to a pith-ball electrified in the air of this room. Then, I say, all the phenomena brought to light by atmospheric electrometers, which we observe on a fine day, would be observed just as they are. The ordinary observation...

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