Life and Times of Judge Caleb Wallace: Some Time a Justice of the Court of Appeals of the State of Kentucky, Issue 4 (Google eBook)

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J.P. Morton, printers, 1888 - Kentucky - 151 pages
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Page 34 - That religion or the duty which we owe to our Creator, and the manner of discharging it, can be directed only by reason and conviction, not by force or violence ; and, therefore, all men are equally entitled to the free exercise of religion, according to the dictates of conscience ; and that it is the mutual duty of all to practice Christian forbearance, love and charity towards each other.
Page 50 - ... further enacted by the authority aforesaid, That nothing in this Act contained shall be construed to extend to...
Page 124 - ... those persons, whom nature hath endowed with genius and virtue, should be rendered by liberal education worthy to receive, and able to guard the sacred deposit of the rights and liberties of their fellow citizens, and that they should be called to that charge without regard to wealth, birth or other accidental condition or circumstance...
Page 124 - ... to illuminate, as far as practicable, the minds of the people at large, and more especially to give them knowledge of those facts which history exhibiteth, that, possessed thereby of the experience of other ages and countries, they may be enabled to know ambition under all its shapes, and prompt to exert their natural powers to defeat its purposes.
Page 123 - Whereas it appeareth that however certain forms of government are better calculated than others to protect individuals in the free exercise of their natural rights, and are at the same time themselves better guarded against degeneracy, yet experience hath...
Page 43 - ... what may be agreeable to their own private choice, or voluntary obligation. This being done, all partial and invidious distinctions will be abolished, to the great honour and interest of the State ; and every one be left to stand or fall according to merit, which can never be the case, so long as any one denomination is established in preference to others. That the great Sovereign of the Universe may inspire you with unanimity, wisdom and resolution ; and bring you to a just determination on...
Page 42 - ... representatives will cheerfully concur in removing every species of religious, as well as civil, bondage. Certain it is that every argument for civil liberty gains additional strength when applied to liberty in the concerns of religion; and there is no argument in favor of establishing the Christian religion but what may be pleaded, with equal propriety, for establishing the tenets of...
Page 41 - It is well known that in the frontier counties, which are justly supposed to contain a fifth part of the inhabitants of Virginia, the Dissenters have borne the heavy burdens of purchasing glebes, building churches, and supporting the established clergy, where there are very few Episcopalians, either to assist in bearing the expense, or to reap the advantage ; and that throughout the other parts of the country there are also many thousands of zealous friends and defenders of our State, who, besides...
Page 41 - ... interwoven with most other political systems. This we are the more strongly encouraged to expect, by the Declaration of Rights, so universally applauded for that dignity, firmness and precision with which it delineates and asserts the privileges of society, and the prerogatives of human nature; and which we embrace as the magna charta of our commonwealth, that can never be violated without endangering the grand superstructure it was destined to sustain.
Page 30 - ... bad influence this practice may have upon servants or any others, it is sufficient to say that there is nothing in our principles or way of worship that tends to promote a spirit of disobedience or disorder, but, much to the contrary; and if any person shall be detected in doing or teaching anything criminal in this respect, we presume he is liable to punishment by a law already in being; therefore we pray that no dissenting minister, according to law may be subjected to any penalty for preaching...

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