Introduction to the Social Sciences: A Textbook Outline (Google eBook)

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Ralston Press, 1913 - Social sciences - 206 pages
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Page 57 - the study of agencies under social control that may improve or impair the racial qualities of future generations, either physically or mentally.
Page 112 - Where the conditions to which material progress everywhere tends are most fully realized that is to say, where population is densest, wealth greatest, and the machinery of production and exchange most highly developed we find the deepest poverty, the sharpest struggle for existence, and the most of enforced idleness.
Page 174 - All that constitutes culture and civilisation, all, or nearly all, that distinguishes the highly cultured European intellectually and morally from the men of the stone age of Europe, is then summed up in the word "tradition," and all tradition exists only in virtue of imitation; for it is only by imitation that each generation takes up and makes its own the tradition of the preceding generation; and it is only by imitation that any improvement, conceived by any mind endowed with that rarest of all...
Page 73 - On the other hand, an income of $900 or over probably permits the maintenance of a normal standard, at least so far as the physical man is concerned.
Page 45 - ... toward minor ailments. Obviously if overfatigue could be reduced to a minimum, this reduction would carry with it the prevention of the major part of minor ailments, which in turn would lead to a great reduction in more serious illness, and this finally would lead to a great reduction in mortality. A typical succession of events is first fatigue, then colds, then tuberculosis, then death.
Page 72 - The child's body is forming at fourteen, and its growth should not be marred by imposing upon it the restrictions which come from factory life.
Page 161 - LITERATURE, a general term which, in default of precise definition, may stand for the best expression of the best thought reduced to writing. Its various forms are the result of race peculiarities, or of diverse individual temperaments, or of political circumstances securing the predominance of one social class which is thus enabled to propagate its ideas and sentiments.
Page 57 - The aim of Eugenics is to bring as many influences as can be reasonably employed, to cause the useful classes in the community to contribute more than their proportion to the next generation.
Page 93 - The lack of food resulting from a lack of income means malnutrition for the whole family.
Page 48 - John Muir, the geologist and naturalist, says that he finds home the most dangerous place he can visit. As long as I camp out in the mountains without tents or blankets I get along very well, but the minute I get into a house and have a warm bed and begin to live on fine food, I get into a draft, and the first thing I know I am coughing and sneezing and threatened with pneumonia, and am altogether miserable.