Results 1-10 of 4

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - LibraryCin - LibraryThing

3.75 stars. This book paints a picture of some of the Southern States affected by the Dirty Thirties. The primary focus is on the people of Boise City, Oklahoma and Dalhart, Texas. The book actually ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - MlleEhreen - LibraryThing

A friend recommended THE WORST HARD TIME to me years ago. She said it was one of the most gruesome disaster books she'd ever read, or something along those lines. I can't remember the exact words, but ... Read full review

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User Review  - MrsLee - LibraryThing

An expose of the dust storms in the 1930's America, written from interviews of the survivors. That is what caught my eye on this book. If the author interviewed survivors though, he rewrote their ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - mom2acat - LibraryThing

These are the true stories of the men, women and children who lived through The Dust Bowl years during the 1930's. Many families left that area when crops failed because of drought and dust storms ... Read full review

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User Review  - Kristelh - LibraryThing

Great book, historical. I am glad I read this book. It is a wonderful book. Doesn't leave you with much hope that we people, God's people, ever learn our lessons. Read full review

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User Review  - stuart10er - LibraryThing

A great book about the dust bowl and those that decided (or were forced to) stay behind. Very topical since Egan shows how bad decisions by people caused the whole dust bowl problem. Those bad decisions are being replicated today in other ways. Short sided thinking at its worst. Read full review

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

Most depressing book I ever read.

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

Hands down the most dry book i have ever been forced to read

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

A very informative story about a major environmental disaster - a disaster whose prime causes were human. A disrespect of natural ecosystems and environmental limits, best summarized by the common phrase "rain follows the plow", combined with greed, speculation leading to a wheat price bubble, and a drought within normal climate variation turned a sublime grassland that once supported bison and Comanches alike into an American desert. Science, in the personification of John Wesley Powell, had warned against such unsustainable agriculture, but like climate science today, was ignored by development boosters and politicians alike. While the perseverance and hard work of the farmers profiled are admirable and hard to comprehend to modern minds, the denial of environmental facts seem all too familiar today. The New Deal responses of Roosevelt and Bennett were well-intentioned and partly successful, but in retrospect the use of tree shelter belts and agricultural subsidies were mistakes that morphed into sometimes counterproductive and problematic government programs. 

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - librarymary09 - LibraryThing

Wow. This is an amazing book, bringing the history of the Great Plains in the 1930s to life. I had no idea how bad things were. Read full review


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