Constable's miscellany of original and selected publications (Google eBook)

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1828
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Page 147 - She repented nothing but, when the Lords and others, at Inverness, came in the morning from the watches, that she was not a man to know what life it was to lie all night in the fields, or to walk upon the causeway with a jack and a knapsack, a Glasgow buckler, and a broadsword.
Page 162 - Why should the pleasing face of a gentlewoman affray me ? I have looked in the faces of many angry men, and yet have not been afraid above measure.
Page 133 - When that the poor have cried, Caesar hath wept: Ambition should be made of sterner stuff: Yet Brutus says he was ambitious; And Brutus is an honourable man. You all did see, that on the Lupercal, I thrice presented him a kingly crown, Which he did thrice refuse.
Page 105 - ... memory of man, that day of the year was never seen a more dolorous face of the heaven, than was at her arrival, which two days after did so continue: for, besides the...
Page 232 - God forbid that I should make so foul a shipwreck of my conscience, or leave so great a blot to my poor posterity, to shed blood without Law or Warrant...
Page 232 - I am so unhappy to have liven to see this unhappy day, in the which I am required, by direction from my most gracious Sovereign, to do an act which God and the law forbiddeth.
Page 287 - Bothwell for her husband, but avoweth constantly that she will live and die with him, and saith that if it were put to her choice to relinquish her crown and kingdom or the Lord Bothwell, she would leave her kingdom and dignity to go as a simple damsel with him, and that she will never consent that he shall fare worse or have more harm than herself.
Page 58 - Mary the utmost beauty of countenance and elegance of shape of which the human form is capable. Her hair was black, though, according to the fashion of that age, she frequently wore borrowed locks, and of different colours.
Page 184 - I know the truth of that, Madam," said I ; " you need not tell it me. Your Majesty thinks, if you were married, you would be but queen of England ; and now you are both king and queen. I know your spirit cannot endure a commander.
Page 245 - ... agreeable woman rather than an illustrious queen. The vivacity of her spirit, not sufficiently tempered with sound judgment, and the warmth of her heart, which was not at all times under the restraint of discretion, betrayed her both into errors and into crimes. To say that she was always unfortunate will not account for that long and almost uninterrupted succession of calamities which befel her; we must likewise add that she was often imprudent.

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