British theatre, comprising tragedies, comedies, operas, and farces; with biogr., critical account and notes, by an Englishman [O. Williams]. By O. Williams (Google eBook)

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Owen Williams (editor of British theatre)
1831
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Page 15 - Heaven itself, that points out an hereafter, And intimates Eternity to man. Eternity ! thou pleasing dreadful thought ! Through what variety of untried being, Through what new scenes and changes must we pass ! The wide, the unbounded prospect lies before me ; But shadows, clouds, and darkness, rest upon it.
Page 21 - And terror on my aching sight ; the tombs And monumental caves of death look cold, And shoot a dullness to my trembling heart. Give me thy hand, and let me hear thy voice, Nay, quickly speak to me, and let me hear Thy voice my own affrights me with its echoes.
Page 51 - My name is NORVAL: on the Grampian hills My father feeds his flocks; a frugal swain, Whose constant cares were to increase his store, And keep his only son, myself, at home.
Page 489 - Ay, your times were fine times indeed; you have been telling us of them for many a long year. Here we live in an old rumbling mansion, that looks for all the world like an inn, but that we never see company. Our best visitors are old Mrs. Oddfish, the curate's wife, and little Cripplegate, the lame dancing-master; and all our entertainment your old stories of Prince Eugene and the Duke of Marlborough. I hate such oldfashioned trumpery. Hard. And I love it. I love every thing that's old : old friends,...
Page 489 - And am I to blame ? The poor boy was always too sickly to do any good. A school would be his death. When he comes...
Page 15 - ... there is all Nature cries aloud Through all her works). He must delight in virtue ; And that which He delights in must be happy. But when ? or where ? This world was made for Caesar I'm weary of conjectures this must end them.
Page 493 - After the disappointments of the day, welcome once more, Charles, to the comforts of a clean room and a good fire. Upon my word, a very well-looking house ; antique, but creditable. MARLOW. The usual fate of a large mansion. Having first ruined the master by good house-keeping, it at last comes to levy contributions as an inn.
Page 493 - Ould Grouse in the gunroom: I can't help laughing at that he! he! he! for the soul of me. We have laughed at that these twenty years ha!
Page 353 - Have I not a wife? nay a wife that was a widow, a young widow, a handsome widow; and would be again a widow, but that I have a heart of proof, and something of a constitution to bustle through the ways of wedlock and this world!
Page 15 - It must be so Plato, thou reasonest well ; Else whence this pleasing hope, this fond desire, This longing after immortality ? Or whence this secret dread, and inward horror, Of falling into nought ? Why shrinks the soul Back on herself, and startles at destruction ? Tis the divinity that stirs within us ; 'Tis heaven itself, that points out an hereafter, And intimates eternity to man ! Eternity ! thou pleasing, dreadful thought ! Through what variety of untried being, Through what new scenes...

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