The End of Privacy: The Attack on Personal Rights at Home, at Work, On-Line, and in Court (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Farrar, Straus, and Giroux, Oct 21, 1999 - Law - 304 pages
0 Reviews

As Justice Louis Brandeis suggested more than a century ago, privacy--the right to be left alone--is the most valued, if not the most celebrated, right enjoyed by Americans. But in the face of computer, video, and audio technology, aggressive and sophisticated marketing databases, state and federal "wars" against crime and terrorism, new laws governing personal behavior, and an increasingly intrusive media, all of us find our personal space and freedom under attack.

In The End of Privacy, Charles Sykes traces the roots of privacy in our nation's founding and Constitution, and reveals its inexorable erosion in our time. From our homes and offices to the presidency, Sykes defines what we have lost, citing example after example of citizens who have had their conversations monitored, movements surveilled, medical and financial records accessed, sexual preferences revealed, homes invaded, possessions confiscated, and even lives threatened--all in the name of some alleged higher social or governmental good. Sykes concludes by suggesting steps by which we might begin to recover the territory we've lost: our fundamental right to our own lives.

  

What people are saying - Write a review

The end of privacy

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

The pervasiveness of computer technology in our daily lives has brought about a moderate degree of "big-brother-is-watching-you" paranoia. Here, journalist Sykes (A Nation of Victims) gives us all ... Read full review

Contents

The Surveillance Society
23
The Snoop Wars
153
The Exposure Culture
183
Toward a Right of Privacy
219
Notes
259
Index
273
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

About the author (1999)

Charles J. Sykes is the author of Dumbing Down Our Kids, A Nation of Victims, and Profscam. He is a journalist who has written for such papers as The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, and The Chicago Tribune. He is a senior fellow at the Wisconsin Policy Research Institute and a research fellow at the Hoover Institution. He has three children and lives in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

Bibliographic information