Insecure Prosperity - Small-Town Jews in Industrial America, 1890-1940

Front Cover
Princeton University Press, 1999 - History - 440 pages
0 Reviews

This captivating story of the Jewish community in Johnstown, Pennsylvania reveals a pattern of adaptation to American life surprisingly different from that followed by Jewish immigrants to metropolitan areas. Although four-fifths of Jewish immigrants did settle in major cities, another fifth created small-town communities like the one described here by Ewa Morawska. Rather than climbing up the mainstream education and occupational success ladder, the Jewish Johnstowners created in the local economy a tightly knit ethnic entrepreneurial niche and pursued within it their main life goals: achieving a satisfactory standard of living against the recurrent slumps in local mills and coal mines and enjoying the company of their fellow congregants. Rather than secularizing and diversifying their communal life, as did Jewish immigrants to larger cities, they devoted their energies to creating and maintaining an inclusive, multipurpose religious congregation.

Morawska begins with an extensive examination of Jewish life in the Eastern European regions from which most of Johnstown's immigrants came, tracing features of culture and social relations that they brought with them to America. After detailing the process by which migration from Eastern Europe occurred, Morawska takes up the social organization of Johnstown, the place of Jews in that social order, the transformation of Jewish social life in the city, and relations between Jews and non-Jews. The resulting work will appeal simultaneously to students of American history, of American social life, of immigration, and of Jewish experience, as well as to the general reader interested in any of these topics.

  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

In the Shtetls and Out
3
Fitting OldCountry Resources into a New Place The Formation of a MultiEthnic Economic Niche
31
Insecure Prosperity
72
Small Town Slow Pace Transformations in Jewish Sociocultural Life
133
In the Middle on the Periphery Involvement in the Local Society
186
Through Several Lenses Making Sense of Their Lives
214
Postwar Era A Decline of the Community
245
SelfReflections of a Fieldworker
255
Members of the Jewish Community in Johnstown and Vicinity Who Participated in This Study
286
NOTES
287
INDEX
361
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (1999)

is Professor of Sociology and History at the University of Pennsylvania and the author of study of Johntown Slavic immigrants, For Bread with Butter.

Bibliographic information