On the Frontier: Reminiscences of Wild Sports, Personal Adventures, and Strange Scenes ... With Eight Illustrations (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Chapman & Hall, 1878 - Frontier and pioneer life - 372 pages
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 27 - ... breath. We were camped on sand, and a big head of water would ground-sluice our foundations from beneath us. Could the sound be made by the distant herd ? The wind was coming directly from them. It was the noise of the herd. They were coming. Byand-by, however, we ceased to hear them. The daywind, which had been dying out, no longer blew. The night-breeze had set in from the opposite direction, and its sigh through the tree-tops, the hoot of the owl, and the ripple of the stream were the only...
Page 355 - That there is a radical mental difference between the races is as certain as that there are physical ones. The dog and wolf as we are told mankind had may have had one pair of ancestors ; but the dog is naturally a domestic animal : so is the white man, and so are some of the American tribes. The wolf still is, he always will be, a savage ; so has been, so always will be, the Apache. The philanthropist sees no apparent reason why, with proper culture, the Apache should not become a useful...
Page 27 - ... were blended in one mighty tumult. We stood spell-bound for an instant, then a thought of terror forced itself upon us. What if the herd should come our way? What if they should stampede over the camp? Nothing could save us. We should be crushed into the earth, ground into powder. There would not be a "grease spot left of us.
Page 27 - ... of us." We might climb a tree, true; but we should be left without transport, without food, without ammunition, out in the wilderness on foot. Better to be killed at once. There was but one safeguard fire! True it would be a beacon to any Indians who might be near, but there was only a possible, contingent danger, while an immediate one stared us in the face. A pile of wood, grass, leaves, anything, everything, was raked together, the contents of the greasepot poured over it, a double-handful...
Page 189 - ... side sufficiently to do so. The wolf looked like an incarnation of the spirit of savagery. His long hair was all turned the wrong way. His eyes glared and glowed ; like opals, they turned all colours green, red, purple. They seemed literally to blaze with ire. When he gnashed his great jaws, their fangs clacked together with a sharp, vicious snap, like the report of a pocket Derrcnger.
Page 189 - ... purple. They seemed literally to blaze with ire. When he gnashed his great jaws, their fangs clacked together with a sharp, vicious snap, like the report of a pocket Derringer. What a subject for the painter or sculptor who could have done justice to that group ! " I dismounted, threw the bridle reins over my arm, and encouraged the dogs with my voice. The wolf, inspired to desperation by the sight of another enemy, made a furious lunge, flung both dogs off, and then, reckless of odds, rushed...
Page 356 - ... man to increase and multiply thereon, and have possession, as it requires a greater number of square miles to support one Apache than a square mile will support civilised families, his extinction is justified by the inevitable logic of the fitness of things. He cannot be developed into a civilised man ; he must give place to him. Circumstances and early training will sometimes make a white boy into a first-rate savage, but that is no argument to prove the converse, only a case of reversion. Our...
Page 234 - ... is ready for each of them, and a snack of refreshment. This is quickly despatched, and they sally forth. On arriving at the roost the hunters scatter out under the tall trees, in the upper boughs of which the game is sleeping, and each picks out his turkey. The first object of the hunter is then to " moon his turkey " that is to say, to get a partial turkey-eclipse of the moon by bringing his eyes and that bird and luminary in line ; this being accomplished, he brings his rifle to his shoulder,...
Page 234 - Turkey eclipse of the moon by bringing his eyes, the bird, and that luminary in a line. This being accomplished, he brings his rifle to his shoulder, pointing it horizontally in a direction which would meet at right angles a perpendicular from the ground to the bird. In this position the moonlight falls full on the barrel of his rifle and lights up its sights. The hunter draws the front sight well down in the notch of the hind one until he gets -his "bead," then he carefully raises his weapon until...
Page iii - CAMPION (JS). ON THE FRONTIER. Reminiscences of Wild Sports, Personal Adventures, and Strange Scenes. With Illustrations. Second Edition.

Bibliographic information