The New Universal Biographical Dictionary, and American Remembrancer of Departed Merit: Containing Complete and Impartial Accounts of the Lives and Writings of the Most Eminent Persons in Every Nation, But More Particularly of Those who Have Signalized Themselves in America. In Four Volumes. Embellished with a Number of Portraits of the Most Distinguished Characters, Engraved from Original Drawings, Volume 3 (Google eBook)

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Johnson & Stryker, at the Literary Printing-Office No. 29 Gold-Street, 1802 - Biography
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Page 336 - I modestly but freely told him : and after some further discourse about it, I pleasantly said to him, Thou hast said much here of paradise lost, but what hast thou to say of paradise found...
Page 63 - Europe, not to survey the sumptuousness of palaces or the stateliness of temples, not to make accurate measurements of the remains of ancient grandeur, nor to form a scale of the curiosity of modern art, not to collect medals or collate manuscripts, but to dive into the depths of dungeons, to plunge into the infection of hospitals, to survey the mansions of sorrow and pain, to take the...
Page 336 - After some common discourses had passed between us, he called for a manuscript of his ; which being brought he delivered to me, bidding me take it home with me, and read it at my leisure ; and when I had so done, return it to him with my judgment thereupon. When I came home, and had set myself to read it, I found it was that excellent poem which he entitled
Page 65 - I am not insensible of the dangers that must attend such a journey. Trusting, however, in the protection of that kind Providence which has hitherto preserved me, I calmly and cheerfully commit myself to the disposal of unerring wisdom. Should it please God to cut off my life in the prosecution of this design, let not my conduct be uncandidly imputed to rashness or enthusiasm, but to a serious, deliberate conviction that I am pursuing the path of duty; and to a sincere desire of being made an instrument...
Page 63 - ... to dive into the depths of dungeons, to plunge into the infection of hospitals, to survey the mansions of sorrow and pain, to take the gauge and dimensions of misery, depression and contempt, to remember the forgotten, to attend to the neglected, to visit the forsaken, and to compare and collate the distresses of all men in all countries.
Page 63 - He has visited all Europe, not to survey the sumptuousness of palaces, or the stateliness of temples; not to make accurate measurements of the remains of ancient grandeur, nor to form a scale of the curiosity of modern art; not to collect medals, or collate manuscripts: but to dive into the depths of dungeons; to plunge into the infection of hospitals; to survey the mansions of sorrow and pain; to take the...
Page 194 - In wandering over the barren plains of inhospitable Denmark, through honest Sweden, frozen Lapland, rude and churlish Finland, unprincipled Russia, and the wide-spread regions of the wandering Tartar, if hungry, dry, cold, wet, or sick, woman has ever been friendly to me, and uniformly so ; and to add to this virtue, so worthy of the appellation of benevolence, these actions have been performed in so free and so kind a manner, that if I was dry I drank the sweet draught, and if hungry ate the coarse...
Page 336 - This is owing to you ; for you put it into my head by the question you put to me at Chalfont ; which before I had not thought of.
Page 374 - That all persons living in this province who confess and acknowledge the one almighty and eternal God to be the creator, upholder, and ruler of the world, and that hold themselves obliged in conscience to live peaceably and justly in civil society...
Page 262 - ... of Medina, to make head against his enemies, than he gave out that God had allowed him and his followers to defend themselves against the infidels; and at length, as his forces increased, he pretended to have the divine leave even to attack them and...

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