Thomas Alva Edison (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Macmillan, 1915 - 201 pages
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Contents

I
1
II
18
III
35
IV
51
V
68
VI
81
VII
93
VIII
108
IX
125
X
137
XI
157
XII
176
Copyright

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Page 15 - I was always a careless boy, and with a mother of different mental caliber I should probably have turned out badly; but her firmness, her sweetness, her goodness, were potent powers to keep me in the right path, I remember I used never to be able to get along at school. I don't know what it was, but I was always at the foot of the class.
Page 148 - Clocks that should announce in articulate speech the time for going home, going to meals, etc. 8 The preservation of languages, by exact reproduction of the manner of pronouncing. 9 Educational purposes; such as preserving the explanations made by a teacher, so that the pupil can refer to them at any moment, and spelling or other lessons placed upon the phonograph for convenience in committing to memory.
Page 16 - I was stupid, and at last I almost decided that I must really be a dunce. My mother was always kind, always sympathetic, and she never misunderstood or misjudged me. But I was afraid to tell her all my difficulties at school, for fear she too might lose her confidence in me. "One day I overheard the teacher tell the inspector that I was 'addled' and it would not be worth while keeping me in school any longer.
Page 96 - ... minor differences in the original vibrations " had not been satisfactorily reproduced, but they attributed it to the imperfect mechanism of the apparatus used, rather than to any fault in the principle on which the operation was made to depend. It was left for Bell to discover that the failure was due not to workmanship but to the principle which was adopted as the basis of what had to be done. He found that what he called the intermittent current...
Page 132 - ... district (through which to supply power). I used to sleep nights on piles of pipes in the station, and I saw every box poured and every connection made on the whole job. I had to! There was nobody else who could superintend it. Finally we got our feeders all down and started to put on an engine and turn one of the machines to see how things were. My heart was in my mouth at first, but everything worked all right and we had more than 500 ohms insulation resistance. Then we started another engine...
Page 141 - Hello!' into the mouthpiece, ran the paper back over the steel point, and heard a faint 'Hello! Hello!' in return. I determined to make a machine that would work accurately, and gave my assistants instructions, telling them what I had discovered. They laughed at me. That's the whole story. The phonograph is the result of the pricking of a finger.
Page 148 - Family Record' a registry of sayings, reminiscences, etc., by members of a family in their own voices, and of the last words of dying persons. 6.
Page 130 - There was nobody else who could superintend it. Finally we got our feeders all down and started to put on an engine and turn over one of the machines to see how things were. My heart was in my mouth at first, but everything worked all right and we had more than 500 ohms insulation resistance. Then we started another engine and threw them in parallel.
Page 141 - I was singing to the mouth-piece of a telephone, when the vibrations of the voice sent the fine steel point into my finger. That set me to thinking. If I could record the actions of the point and send the point over the same surface afterward, I saw no reason why the thing would not talk. I tried the experiment first on a strip of telegraph paper, and found that the point made an alphabet. I shouted the words
Page 96 - ... vibrations. Such was his discovery, and it was new. Reis never thought of it, and he failed to transmit speech telegraphically ; Bell did, and he succeeded. Under such circumstances, it is impossible to hold that what Reis did was an anticipation of the discovery of Bell. To follow Reis is to fail, but to follow Bell is to succeed.

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