An Oration Delivered at Concord, April the Nineteenth, 1825, Volume 16, Issue 1 (Google eBook)

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Cummings, Hilliard and Company, 1825 - Concord, Battle of, 1775 - 59 pages
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Page 44 - ... barter and sale is made out. But the people never invade ; and when they rise against the invader, are never subdued. If they are driven from the plains, they fly to the mountains. Steep rocks and everlasting hills are their castles ; the tangled, pathless thicket their palisado, and nature, — God, is their ally. Now he overwhelms the hosts of their enemies beneath his drifting mountains of sand ; now he buries them beneath a falling atmosphere of polar snows ; he lets loose his tempests on...
Page 11 - ... foe. But when we trace him to his home, we are confounded at the reflection, that the same Spartan heroism to which he sacrificed himself at Thermopylae, would have led him to tear his...
Page 34 - British party, after the loss of several killed and wounded, toward the centre of the town, followed by the brave band who had driven them from their post. The advance party of British at Colonel Barrett's was thus left to its fate ; and nothing would have been more easy than to effect its entire destruction. But the idea of a declared war had yet scarcely forced itself, with all its consequences, into the minds of our countrymen ; and these advanced companies were allowed to return unmolested to...
Page 32 - The destruction of property and of arms was hasty and incomplete, and considered as the object of an enterprise of such fatal consequences, it stands in shocking contrast with the waste of blood by which it was effected. I am relating events, which though they can never be repeated more frequently than they deserve, are yet familiar to all who hear me. I need not, therefore, attempt, nor would it be practicable did I attempt it, to recall the numerous interesting occurrences of that ever memorable...
Page 8 - ... of this nation ; but it is not our only duty, it is not our first duty. America owes an earlier and a higher duty to the great and good men, who caused her to be a nation ; who, at an expense of treasure, a contempt of peril, a prodigality of...
Page 44 - But, in the efforts of the people, of the people struggling for their rights, moving not in organized, disciplined masses, but in their spontaneous action, man for man, and heart for heart, — though I like not war, nor any of its works, — there is something glorious. They can then move forward without orders, act together without combination, and brave the flaming lines of battle, without entrenchments to cover, or walls to shield them. No dissolute camp has worn off, from the feelings of the...
Page 10 - God that we can find them nearer home, in our own country, on our own soil ; that strains of the noblest sentiment that ever swelled in the breast of man, are breathing to us out of every page of our country's history, in the native...
Page 44 - The people always conquer. They always must conquer. Armies may be defeated ; kings may be overthrown, and new dynasties imposed by foreign arms on an ignorant and slavish race, that care not in what language the covenant of their subjection runs, nor in whose name the deed of their barter and sale is made out. But the people never invade ; and when they rise against the invader, are never subdued. If they are driven from the plains, they fly to the mountains. Steep rocks and everlasting hills are...
Page 39 - a very heavy fire," which must soon have led to the destruction or capture of the whole corps. At this critical moment, it pleased Providence that a reinforcement should arrive. Colonel Smith had sent back a messenger from Lexington to...

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