Coffee and its adulterations (Google eBook)

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New York Printing Company, 1867 - 8 pages
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Page 10 - To avoid fine, this book should be returned on or before the date last stamped below. Photomount Pamphlet Binder Gaylord Bros., Inc.
Page 2 - As a beverage the natives universally prefer the leaf to the berry, giving as a reason that it contains more of the bitter principle, and is more nutritious. In the lowlands, coffee is not planted for the berry, not being sufficiently productive ; but, for the leaf, the people plant it round their houses for their own use. It is an undoubted fact that everywhere they prefer the leaf to the berry...
Page 6 - ... individuality, and colour, and the increase in bulk being about one-half a cubic centimetre. If it is chicory it sinks instantly, nearly the whole mass tumbling into the small tube in a single minute, and even in its rapid passage through the water imparting to it a deep brown colour, and an odour somewhat like that of liquorice. The tint of the particles is at the same time altered greatly ; the expansion of the mass is also very considerable, its bulk in a short time increasing to nearly two...
Page 4 - Roasted coffee possesses powerfully anti-soporific properties : hence its use as a drink by those who desire nocturnal study, and as an antidote to counteract the effects of opium and other narcotics, and to relieve intoxication. In those unaccustomed to its use, it is apt to occasion thirst and constipation.
Page 7 - The presence of chicory is readily and satisfactorily proved ; and if peas, beans, &c. are present, they may be easily distinguished by the peculiarities of the starch-cells of each. Such microscopic examinations are greatly facilitated by the use of the tubes I have described ; for when the subsidence is complete, and we have read off the proportion of adulteration, it only remains to remove the cork gently from the small tube and allow a little of the lower portion of the sediment which contains...
Page 6 - ... solutions, we obtain an indication of the proportion of chicory to coffee, which coincides very nearly with that employed in making the mixture. The tint of the fluid in the large tube and the increase in the bulk of the solid matter are also of use in arriving at a correct estimate. After the performance of a few experiments with mixtures of coffee and chicory in different proportions, a degree of expertness is obtained which enables the operator to form an accurate estimate...
Page 6 - ... majority of instances it falls in a few hours, and imparts to the water in the large tube a delicate amber tint and a faint coffee-like odour, each particle as it rests in the small tube retaining its outline, individuality, and colour, and the increase in bulk being about one-half a cubic centimetre. If it is chicory it sinks instantly, nearly the whole mass tumbling into the small tube in a single minute, and even in its rapid passage through the water imparting to it a deep brown colour, and...
Page 5 - ... a number of these tubes, with a suitable stand and a small measure holding one cubic centimetre, complete the apparatus. When it is to be used, the tube is closed below and filled to within half an inch of the upper extremity (a) with cold water (that has been boiled to expel the gas and kept in a well-stoppered bottle to prevent its reabsorption) ; a cubic centimetre of the sample of ground coffee under examination is then cautiously dropped on the surface of the water, when we should notice...
Page 6 - ... estimate of the amount of each ingredient in any sample that may be submitted for his examination. Not only may coffee be thus to a great extent separated from any chicory with which it is mingled, but nearly all the other substances used for the purposes of adulteration, as exhausted coffee-grounds, wheat, etc., also subside rapidly with the chicory and collect in the small tube. If it is desired to determine the character of the matter that precipitates quickly, we must resort to the microscope,...
Page 7 - ... is mingled, but nearly all the other substances used for the purposes of adulteration, as exhausted coffee-grounds, wheat, etc., also subside rapidly with the chicory and collect in the small tube. If it is desired to determine the character of the matter that precipitates quickly, we must resort to the microscope, when, by the nature of the cells and other structures found, we can soon decide upon the true character of the foreign substances. The presence of chicory is readily and satisfactorily...

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