Two Historical Plays on the Life and Reign of Queen Elizabeth, Volume 6 (Google eBook)

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Shakespeare Society, 1851 - Historical drama - 177 pages
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Page 62 - They bear the mandate; they must sweep my way, And marshal me to knavery. Let it work; For 'tis the sport to have the enginer Hoist with his own petar...
Page 12 - Philip and Mary, by the grace of God, king and queen of England, France, Naples, Jerusalem, and Ireland, defenders of the faith...
Page iii - WILLIAM AYRTON, ESQ., FRS, FSA BAYLE BERNARD, ESQ. THE RIGHT HON. THE VICE-CHANCELLOR SIR JAMES KNIGHT BRUCE, FRS, FSA J. PAYNE COLLIER, ESQ., VPSA, DIRECTOR. W. DURRANT COOPER, ESQ., FSA BOLTON CORNEY, ESQ., MRSL PETER CUNNINGHAM, ESQ., TREASURER. CHARLES DICKENS, ESQ. SIR HENRY ELLIS, KH, PRINCIPAL LIBRARIAN OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM, FRS, FSA JOHN FORSTER, ESQ.
Page 106 - And send but for one hundred pound ? Friend, come in ; Come in, friend; shall have two; Queen shall have two. If Queen know Hobson once, her Hobson's purse Must be free for her; she is England's nurse. Come in, good friend. Ha ! Queen know Hobson ? Nay, come in, John ; we'll dine together too.
Page 37 - A DUMB SHOW. Enter WINCHESTER, Constable, BARWICK, and Friars : at the other door, two Angels. The Friars step to her, offering to kill her : the Angel drives them back.
Page 126 - John. [Exeunt. Enter JOHN and Courtesan. Cour. Sweet youth, thou art too young, and yet scarce ripe To taste the sweetness of my mellowed love. John. That's the reason I set thy teeth on edge thus; but thou know'st I promis'd to have a bout with thee at our last parley, and I have come to perform my word: name the weapon. John. Then ward your lips well, or you'll ha' the first veney. Cour. I have no ward but this: my tender sex Have not the manly skill to break a thrust. Oh, how I dote on thee! I...
Page v - With the Building of the Royal Exchange, and the famous Victory of Queen Elizabeth in the year 1588;" those events forming most prominent incidents.
Page vii - Did throng the seats, the boxes, and the stage, ' So much, that some by stenography drew ' The plot, put it in print, scarce one word true...
Page 86 - tis man's nature, he desires his woe. [.4 storm. Now, passion a me, Sir Thomas, a cruel storm; An we stay long, we shall be wet to th' skin. I do not like 't : nay ; and it angers me, That such a famous city as this is, Wherein so many gallant merchants are, Have not a place to meet in, but in this, Where every show'r of rain must trouble them. I cannot tell, but if I live. Let's step to the Pope's head ; We shall be dropping dry if we stay here. I'll have a mansion built, and such a...
Page iv - The COUNCIL of the NAVY RECORDS SOCIETY wish it to be distinctly understood that they are not answerable for any opinions or observations that may appear in the Society's publications. For these the responsibility rests entirely with the Editors of the several works.