Biography of the bar of Orleans County, Vermont (Google eBook)

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Vermont Watchman and State Journal Press, 1886 - Lawyers - 303 pages
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Page 144 - Reason is the life of the law, nay, the common law itself is nothing else but reason...
Page 106 - Johnson to the state constitutional convention, and represented that town in the legislature in 1836 and 1837, and in the latter year was elected by the legislature one of the state commissioners of the deaf, dumb and blind, and during the same period he held the office of judge of probate. He removed to Chelsea in 1838, and represented that town in the legislature in 1840, 1841, 1842 and 1843, during which time he served on the judiciary committee, the last year as its chairman. He was elected state...
Page 161 - Than the soft myrtle: but man, proud man, Drest in a little brief authority, Most ignorant of what he's most assured, His glassy essence, like an angry ape, Plays such fantastic tricks before high heaven As make the angels weep; who, with our spleens, Would all themselves laugh mortal.
Page 144 - NJ , graduating from the latter in 1869; studied law and was admitted to the bar, and began the practice of his profession in Lowville in 1873; in 1885 was elected to the State senate from the district consisting of Lewis, St.
Page 129 - What amounts to adhering to and giving aid and comfort to our enemies, it is somewhat difficult in all cases to define ; but certain it is that furnishing them with arms, or munitions of war, vessels, or other means of transportation, or any materials which...
Page 246 - Be thou familiar, but by no means vulgar. The friends thou hast, and their adoption tried, Grapple them to thy soul with hooks of steel ; But do not dull thy palm with entertainment Of each new-hatch'd, unfledg'd comrade.
Page 93 - There is, said Michael, if thou well observe The rule of not too much, by temperance taught In what thou eat'st and drink'st, seeking from thence Due nourishment, not gluttonous delight, Till many years over thy head return, So may'st thou live, till like ripe fruit thou drop Into thy mother's lap, or be with ease Gather'd, not harshly pluck'd, for death mature, This is old age...
Page 136 - States, which must yet prevail ; also for cheap ocean postage, another annual proposition ; also for post-office orders, as a mode of transfer of money in small sums for the accommodation of the poor, an idea recently adopted by the House Committee on...
Page 176 - A Novel was a book Three-volumed, and once read, and oft crammed full Of poisonous error, blackening every page, And oftener still, of trifling, second-hand Remark, and old, diseased, putrid thought. And miserable incident, at war With nature, with itself and truth at war ; Yet charming still the greedy reader on, Till done, he tried to recollect his thoughts, And nothing found but dreaming emptiness.
Page 93 - Not too much,' by temperance taught In what thou eat'st and drink'st, seeking from thence Due nourishment, not gluttonous delight, Till many years over thy head return: So may'st thou live, till like ripe Fruit thou drop Into thy Mother's lap, or be with ease Gathered, not harshly plucked, for death mature...

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