Correspondence of Scientific Men of the Seventeenth Century: Including Letters of Barrow, Flamsteed, Wallis, and Newton, Printed from the Originals in the Collection of the Right Honourable the Earl of Macclesfield, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

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Stephen Peter Rigaud, Bishop Stephen Jordan Rigaud
At the University Press, 1841 - Science
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Page 262 - ... most capable of objecting against his writings, that least understand them. However, in a little time, you will see some of them in the Philosophical Transactions. . I am, Sir, Very much your friend and servant, WILLIAM JONES. Answer to the foregoing, by Mr. COTE.S DEAR SIR, I have received Moreton's book. I thank you for the favour you did me in sending it. I have looked over what relates to his way of interpolation ; but I find no cause from thence to make any alteration. The controversy concerning...
Page 160 - Books and experiments do well together, but separately they betray an imperfection, for the illiterate is anticipated unwittingly by the labours of the ancients, and the man of authors deceived by story instead of science.
Page 8 - ... 1 N. 1 refers to the Circles of Proportion. The other notes apply to the superscripts found in the column, "Meanings of Symbols." In further confirmation of our view we quote from Oughtred's letter to W. Robinson: "Division is wrought by setting the divisor under the dividend with a line between them."1 5. In Gilbert Clark's Oughtredm explicatus there is no mark whatever to separate the characteristic and mantissa.
Page 46 - This is that admirable secret, which, as all other things, appeared when it pleased the All Disposer, at whose direction a spider's line drawn in an opened case could first give me by its perfect apparition, when I was with two convexes trying experiments about the sun, the unexpected knowledge.
Page 224 - ... quarter of an hour." 1 After the death of Linus, his pupil, Mr. Gascoigne, entered the field, and declared that Linus had shown to various persons in Liege his experiment, proving the spectrum to be circular, and that Mr. Newton could not be more confident on his side than they were on the other, being fully " persuaded, that unless the diversity of placing the prism, or the bigness of the hole, or some other such circumstance, be the cause of the difference between them, Mr. Newton's experiment...
Page 262 - ... edition of the Principia finished ; but I never think the time lost, when we stay for Sir Isaac's further corrections and improvements of so very valuable a book, especially when this seems to be the last time he will concern himself with it. I am sensible his other business allows him but little time for these things, and therefore I cannot hasten him so much as I might otherwise do. I am very well satisfied to wait till he has leisure.
Page 155 - ... in result the answer was, they could not be found. I am afraid the search was but perfunctory, and that, if his lordship (now at leisure) were solicited for them, he might write to his son the Lord Cornbury to make a diligent search for them. One Mr. Protheroe, in Wales, was executor to Mr. Harriot, and from him the Lord Vaughan, the Earl of Carbery's son, received more than a quire of Mr. Harriot's Analytics.
Page 263 - Clare-Hall, seems to have nearly the same design with those German and French objectants, whom you mention. His book is now in our press, and almost finished I am told; he will add an Appendix, in which he undertakes also to square the circle. I need not recommend his performance any further to you, I am, Sir, your obliged friend, And humble servant, RC " of her company cautious, in her friendfhip " trufly, to her parents dutiful, and to her From Mr.
Page 89 - ... my health, and the greatness of my age (approaching now to an end) would permit, perused your most learned papers, of several choice arguments, which you sent me: wherein I do first with thankfulness acknowledge to God, the Father of lights, the great light he hath given you; and next I congratulate you, even with admiration, the clearness and perspicacity of your understanding and genius, who have not only gone, but also opened a way into these profoundest mysteries of art, unknown and not thought...
Page 263 - Hall, seems to have nearly the same design with those German and French objectants whom you mention. His book is now in our press, and almost finished, I am told ; he will add an Appendix, in which he undertakes also to square the circle. I need not recommend his performance any further to you. I am, sir, Your obliged friend and humble servant, RC FROM MR.

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