Policing Stalin's Socialism: Repression and Social Order in the Soviet Union, 1924-1953 (Google eBook)

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Yale University Press, Sep 29, 2009 - Biography & Autobiography - 532 pages
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Policing Stalin's Socialism is one of the first books to emphasize the importance of social order repression by Stalin's Soviet regime in contrast to the traditional emphasis of historians on political repression. Based on extensive examination of new archival materials, David Shearer finds that most repression during the Stalinist dictatorship of the 1930s was against marginal social groups such as petty criminals, deviant youth, sectarians, and the unemployed and unproductive. It was because Soviet leaders regarded social disorder as more of a danger to the state than political opposition that they instituted a new form of class war to defend themselves against this perceived threat. Despite the combined work of the political and civil police the efforts to cleanse society failed; this failure set the stage for the massive purges that decimated the country in the late 1930s.
  

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Contents

Policing Social Order and Repression under Stalin
1
1 A New Kind of Class War
19
2 Police and Social Disorder
64
3 A Soviet Gendarmerie
94
4 Informants Surveillance and Prophylactic Policing
130
5 Cataloging the Population
158
6 The Campaigns against Marginals
181
Illustrations
218
8 Passports Identity and Mass Policing
243
Background to the Great Purges
285
10 The Mechanics of Mass Purging
320
The Case of Kiril Korenev
371
12 The War and Postwar Trends
405
Repression Citizenship and Stalins Socialism
437
Notes
441
Index
499

7 Policing Juveniles Policing Debates
219

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