Saint Joan of Arc: Born, January 6th, 1412, Burned as a Heretic, May 30th, 1431, Canonised as a Saint, May 16th, 1920

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Grove Press, 2001 - Biography & Autobiography - 395 pages
6 Reviews
Vita Sackville-West wrote Saint Joan of Arc in 1936 at the age of forty-four, and had, at that point, already been writing for thirty years. At fourteen, Sackville-West published her first book, and at fourteen Joan of Arc first heard the voices. Joan was seventeen when she took command of the armies of France -- a peasant girl in the early fifteenth century in charge of a nation's forces. At nineteen she was captured by the British and tried as a witch by a church court. Before her twentieth birthday she was burned at the stake. In 1920 she was canonized by the Roman Catholic Church as a saint.

In a clever, brisk voice, Vita Sackville-West tells the triumphant story of a French peasant girl raised in a country torn apart by the Hundred Years' War who rose from poverty to military greatness. With dazzling insight and clarity, Sackville-West breathes new life into Joan of Arc's beautiful and tragic story.

  

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Review: Saint Joan of Arc

User Review  - Ted Mccombs - Goodreads

Vita Sackville-West's scholarship is extensive and presented joyfully--although it's been challenged by later scholars--but the greatest value I took from this book was her application of the novelist ... Read full review

Review: Saint Joan of Arc

User Review  - Ron Stafford - Goodreads

A very strange take on St. Joan Read full review

Contents

II
1
III
13
IV
24
V
34
VI
62
VII
80
VIII
105
IX
134
XIV
237
XV
262
XVI
285
XVII
313
XVIII
337
XIX
343
XX
357
XXI
377

X
149
XI
171
XII
197
XIII
224
XXII
381
XXIII
385
Copyright

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About the author (2001)

Poet and novelist Vita Sackville-West began writing as a child. Born at elegant Knole Castle, scene of Virginia Woolf's novel Orlando (1928), Sackville-West was educated in that 365-room dwelling. In 1913 she married Harold Nicolson (see Vol. 3), journalist, diplomat, and biographer. Despite Nicolson's homosexuality and her own lesbian affair with Violet Trefusis, this marriage survived. Poems of East and West, her first book, was published in 1917. She remained unknown except by a small group of literary connoisseurs until 1927, when she received the Hawthornden Prize for a second volume of poetry. At this time she lived in London and was part of the Bloomsbury group, which also included Lytton Strachey (see Vol. 3), E. M. Forster, John Maynard Keynes (see Vol. 3), and Woolf. Sackville-West published many novels and volumes of poetry, biography, and family history, and several books on gardening, as well as book reviews and criticism. All of her writings reflect the same unhurried approach, deep reflection, and brilliantly polished style. Her influence on other writers, especially Woolf, was perhaps greater than her own individual achievement. The Edwardians (1930) and All Passion Spent (1931) are her best-known novels. Sackville-West's son, Nigel Nicholson, recounted the close, but unconventional relationship of his parents in the memoir Portrait of a Marriage, published in 1973.

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