Our sister Killjoy or Reflections from a black-eyed squint

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Longman, 1997 - Fiction - 134 pages
11 Reviews
In this novel, the author explores the thoughts and experiences of a Ghanaian girl on her travels through Europe. It offers a running commentary on Sissie's feelings of alienation, her reflections on European culture and "civilization" and her return to the warmth of home in Africa.

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Review: Our Sister Killjoy

User Review  - Vera - Goodreads

Amazing how the narrative perspective in this 1977 prose poem is still a strikingly unusual and pertinent commentary on the African encounter with the West on European soil. A very well-written postcolonial text. Read full review

Review: Our Sister Killjoy

User Review  - Nina - Goodreads

I suppose this could be described as a novel-in-stories and partly in verse. It's a beautifully written story about black bodies in foreign (read: cold, white) spaces. I was particularly excited to ... Read full review

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About the author (1997)

Ama Ata Aidoo has distinguished herself as a writer and as a consultant on education and gender issues. She graduated from the English Department of the University of Ghana, Legon, where she was immediately appointed Junior Research Fellow of Advanced Creative Writing Program at Stanford University and, in the early 1980s, a Minister of Education in Ghana. While lecturing in the Department of English at the University of Cape Coast in the 1970s she was also appointed to serve on the Board of Directors of the Ghana Medical and Dental Council. She has travelled widely, and has been appointed Visiting Professor and Distinguished Visiting Professor to the English, Theatre, African, and African American Studies departments in a number of universities and colleges in the United States. She is the Executive Director of Mbaasem, a foundation to support African American women writers and their work. Her publications include the dramas The Dilemma of a Ghost (Longman, Harlow, 1965) and Anowa (Longman, Harlow, 1970); the short stories No Sweetness Here (Longman, Harlow, 1970); the novels Our Sister Killjoy or Reflections from a Black-Eyed Squint (Longman, Harlow, 1977 and Changes (The Women's Press, London, 1991); the poetry Someone Talking to Sometime (College Press, Harare, 1985) and An Angry letter in January and Other Poems (Dangaroo Press, Coventry, 1992); and the children's books The Eagle and the Chickens and Other Stories (Tana Press, Enugu, 1986) and Birds and Other Poems (College Press, Harare, 1987). Ama Ata Aidoo's many awards include the Nelson Mandela Prize for Poetry in 1987 for Someone Talking to Sometime and the Commonwealth Writers' Prize for Africa for Changes in 1992.

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