Forces of Labor: Workers' Movements and Globalization Since 1870

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Cambridge University Press, Apr 21, 2003 - Business & Economics - 238 pages
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Recasting labor studies in a long-term and global framework, the book draws on a major new database on world labor unrest to show how local labor movements have been related to world-scale political, economic, and social processes since the late nineteenth century. Through an in-depth empirical analysis of select global industries, the book demonstrates how the main locations of labor unrest have shifted from country to country together with shifts in the geographical location of production. It shows how the main sites of labor unrest have shifted over time together with the rise or decline of new leading sectors of capitalist development and demonstrates that labor movements have been deeply embedded (as both cause and effect) in world political dynamics. Over the history of the modern labor movement, the book isolates what is truly novel about the contemporary global crisis of labor movements. Arguing against the view that this is a terminal crisis, the book concludes by exploring the likely forms that emergent labor movements will take in the twenty-first century.

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Review: Forces of Labor: Workers' Movements and Globalization Since 1870

User Review  - Jeff - Goodreads

good book. good information--sociology lacks the poetic quality that history and other theory has which is fun to read. i also thought a closer look at the marxian value category (and it's evolution ... Read full review

About the author (2003)

Silver is associate professor sociology at Johns Hopkins University.

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