Memoirs of His Own Time: With Reminiscences of the Men and Events of the Revolution (Google eBook)

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Lindsay & Blakiston, 1846 - United States - 504 pages
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Page 87 - Is it not monstrous that this player here, But in a fiction, in a dream of passion, Could force his soul so to his own conceit That from her working all his visage wann'd, Tears in his eyes, distraction in his aspect, A broken voice, and his whole function suiting With forms to his conceit?
Page 32 - I'm drest all in my best To walk abroad with Sally; She is the darling of my heart, And she lives in our alley.
Page 341 - Constitution, which we now present, is the result of a spirit of amity, and of that mutual deference and concession which the peculiarity of our political situation rendered indispensable.
Page 371 - BRIBE-WORTHY service, He acquired, or more properly created, A MINISTERIAL ESTATE. He was the only person of his time Who could CHEAT without the mask of HONESTY, Retain his primeval MEANNESS When possessed of TEN THOUSAND a year, And having daily deserved the GIBBET for what he did, Was at last condemned to it for what he could not do.
Page 331 - Things vulgar and, well weighed, scarce worth the praise? They praise, and they admire they know not what. And know not whom, but as one leads the other; And what delight to be by such extolled, To live upon their tongues and be their talk, Of whom to be dispraised were no small praise, His lot who dares be singularly good?
Page 461 - ... articles you ground your charge, that I may prepare for my justification, which I have the happiness to be confident I can do to the army, to the Congress, to America, and to the world in general. Your Excellency must give me leave to observe, that neither yourself, nor those about your person, could from your situation be in the least judges of the merits or demerits of our manoeuvres; and, to speak with a becoming pride, I can assert that to these mancEuvres the success of the day was entirely...
Page 126 - ... march. I happened to be at the coffee-house when the concourse arrived there. They made a halt, while the doctor, foaming with rage and indignation, without his hat, his wig dishevelled and bloody from his wounded hand, stood up in the cart and called for a bowl of punch.
Page 359 - Against us are the Executive, the Judiciary, two out of three branches of the Legislature, all the officers of the government, all who want to be officers, all timid men who prefer the calm of despotism to the boisterous sea of liberty...
Page 402 - Besides, they are less under responsibility to one of the greatest controlling powers on earth, the sense of fame and estimation. The share of infamy, that is likely to fall to the lot of each individual in public acts, is small indeed ; the operation of opinion being in the inverse ratio to the number of those who abuse power. Their own approbation of their own acts has to them the appearance of a public judgment in their favour. A perfect democracy is therefore the most shameless thing in the world.
Page 119 - Their praise is hymn'd by loftier harps than mine: Yet one I would select from that proud throng, Partly because they blend me with his line, And partly that I did his sire some wrong...

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