The City Game: Basketball from the Garden to the Playgrounds (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Open Road Media, Jun 28, 2011 - Sports & Recreation - 210 pages
10 Reviews
A fascinating chronicle of New York basketball, from the concrete courts of the city’s parks to the bright lights of Madison Square GardenThe New York Knickerbockers, one of the NBA’s charter franchises, played professionally for twenty-four years before winning their first championship in 1970, defeating the Los Angeles Lakers in a thrilling seven-game series. Those Knicks, who won again in 1973, became legends, and captivated a city that has basketball in its blood. But this book is more than a history of the championship Knicks. It is an exploration of what basketball means to New York—not just to the stars who compete nightly in the garden, but to the young men who spend their nights and weekends perfecting their skills on the concrete courts of the city’s parks. Basketball is a city game, and New York is the king of cities.
  

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Review: The City Game: Basketball from the Garden to the Playgrounds

User Review  - Micah - Goodreads

I liked this book - especially the juxtaposition between the Knicks and the street ballers - but it reads like an extended newspaper article at times as Axthelm relies far too much on extended quotations that can go on for paragraphs at a time. Read full review

Review: The City Game: Basketball from the Garden to the Playgrounds

User Review  - Riccardo Leroux - Goodreads

Great basketball playground book Read full review

Contents

Introduction
BOOK I
1
2
3
4
BOOK II
5
BOOK III
10
11
12
13
BOOK IV
14
15

6
7
8
9
16
17
Acknowledgments
Copyright

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About the author (2011)

For three decades Pete Axthelm (1943–1991) was one of the dominant voices in New York sportswriting. He wrote his first book, The Modern Confessional Novel, while he was a student at Yale, and succeeded in having it published at the age of twenty-four. Upon graduating, he went on to work for the New York Herald Tribune, where he covered sports in all their forms. He graduated to the national stage in the 1970s, writing for Newsweek and Sports Illustrated, and then moved on to television. In the 1980s he reported on football for NBC and horse racing for a young ESPN. Axthelm died in Pittsburgh in 1991.

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