The World of Mathematics, Volume 3

Front Cover
James Roy Newman
Courier Dover Publications, 2000 - Mathematics - 624 pages
10 Reviews
Vol. 3 of a monumental 4-volume set covers such topics as statistics and the design of experiments, group theory, the mathematics of infinity, the unreasonableness of mathematics, the vocabulary of mathematics, and mathematics as an art. Specific contributions by Jacob Bernoulli, George Bernard Shaw, Bertrand Russell, Hans Hahn, Ernst Mach, Hermann Weyl, George Boole, Alfred Tarski, and many others. Informative commentary by noted mathematics scholar James R. Newman precedes each essay. Numerous figures.
  

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Review: The World of Mathematics Set

User Review  - Hugh Chatfield - Goodreads

Not something you read cover to cover. You can dip in and out just about anywhere, First discovered this set in the local library and later purchased my own copy. Great reading in mathematics. You do't need advanced mathematics to enjoy this trio of books. Read full review

Review: The World of Mathematics Set

User Review  - Derek Davis - Goodreads

Part way into vol. 2, good stuff, but what am I actually learning? Need to settle down with some elementary calculus and relearn what I forgot 40 years ago Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

Commentary
1416
Foundations of Vital Statistics
1421
First Life Insurance Tables
1437
Commentary
1448
The Law of Large Numbers
1452
Commentary
1456
Sampling and Standard Error
1459
On the Average and Scatter
1487
Commentary
1767
The Essence of Mathematics
1773
Commentary
1784
The Economy of Science
1787
Commentary
1796
Measurement
1797
Numerical Laws and the Use of Mathematics in Science
1814
Commentary
1830

Mathematics of a Lady Tasting Tea
1512
Commentary
1522
The Vice of Gambling and the Virtue of Insurance
1524
The Supreme Art of Abstraction Group Theory
1533
Commentary
1534
The Group Concept
1538
The Theory of Groups
1558
Mathematics of Infinity
1575
Mathematics and the Metaphysicians
1576
Commentary
1591
Infinity
1593
Mathematical Truth and the Structure of Mathematics
1613
Commentary
1614
On the Nature of Mathematical Truth
1619
Geometry and Empirical Science
1635
The Axiomatic Method
1647
Goedels Proof
1668
A Mathematical Science
1696
Mathematics and the World
1708
Mathematical Postulates and Human Understanding
1723
The Mathematical Way of Thinking
1755
Commentary
1756
The Study That Knows Nothing of Observation
1758
The Mathematical Way of Thinking
1832
Mathematics and Logic
1851
Commentary
1852
Mathematical Analysis of Logic
1856
History of Symbolic Logic
1859
Symbolic Notation Haddocks Eyes and the DogWalking Ordinance
1878
Symbolic Logic
1901
The Unreasonableness of Mathematics
1933
Commentary
1934
Paradox Lost and Paradox Regained
1936
The Crisis in Intuition
1956
How to Solve It
1977
Commentary
1978
How to Solve It
1980
The Vocabulary of Mathematics
1993
Commentary
1994
New Names for Old
1996
Mathematics as an Art
2011
Commentary
2012
Mathematics as an Art
2015
INDEX
2023
Copyright

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About the author (2000)

James R. Newman's World of Mathematics
James R. Newman (1907–1966) was a rare mathematician who was also a lawyer who held several administrative positions in the United States government during and after World War II, including Chief Intelligence Officer at the US Embassy in London. His mammoth four-volume World of Mathematics was first published in 1956 and reprinted by Dover in 2000. It represented the culmination of a fifteen-year effort by Newman, in his later years as a member of the Editorial Board of Scientific American, to assemble in one publication what he considered the most important essays in the field. It's the book that has introduced generations of students to the range and extent of mathematical literature.

In the Author's Own Words:
"The Theory of Groups is a branch of mathematics in which one does something to something and then compares the result with the result obtained from doing the same thing to something else, or something else to the same thing."

"The discovery in 1846 of the planet Neptune was a dramatic and spectacular achievement of mathematical astronomy. The very existence of this new member of the solar system, and its exact location, were demonstrated with pencil and paper; there was left to observers only the routine task of pointing their telescopes at the spot the mathematicians had marked." ― James R. Newman

Critical Acclaim for The World of Mathematics:
"Others with bigger and now whetted appetites will no doubt regard this book as a generous hors d’oeuvre and obtain additional fare by pursuing the numerous recommendations made by the author." ― Morris Kline, New York Herald Tribune Book Review

"Promises to be the most frequently used reference book on mathematics, as well as a delight to readers with a wide range of backgrounds." ― J.G. Kemeny, The New York Times

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