Handbook of Organic Chemistry: For the Use of Students (Google eBook)

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A.S. Barnes & Company, 1857 - Chemistry, Inorganic - 480 pages
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Page 259 - It would, however, appear that the two acids are essentially the same ; for their salts are in general very similar, and all explode when heated. Now that picric acid is recognized as so frequent a product of the action of nitric acid, we have no difficulty in understanding its occurrence here. ALCALOIDS OR ORGANIC BASES. These names are given to a class of nitrogenized organic compounds which, in their relations, are quite analogous to ammonia, or rather to oxide of ammonium. They are to be distinguished...
Page 286 - When pure, starch is a snow-white powder of a glistening appearance, which makes a crackling noise when pressed with the finger. It is composed of transparent rounded grains, the size of which varies in different plants, those of the potato being among the largest, and those of wheat and rice the smallest. It...
Page 286 - ... as in that of cinnamon; and in pulpy fruits, such as the apple, Finally, it is contained in the expressed juice of most vegetables, such as the carrot, in a state of suspension, being deposited on standing. The starch of commerce is chiefly extracted from wheat flour and potatoes.
Page 78 - K= Csy, K. The best process for obtaining this salt is to melt at a gentle heat (only raised at the end to low redness) 46 parts of dried ferrocyanide of potassium, 32 of sulphur, and 17 of pure carbonate of potash. The mass when cold is boiled with water, and the solution, being filtered and evaporated, deposites striated prismatic crystals of the salt, very similar in appearance, and in taste also, to iutre.
Page 278 - C12H5N04, and may be viewed as benzol, in which 1 eq. of hydrogen is replaced by 1 eq. of hyponitric acid. When nitrobenzol is heated with an alcoholic solution of caustic potassa, and the product subjected to distillation, a red oily liquid passes over ; this is a mixture of several substances from which, on cooling, large red crystals separate, which are nearly insoluble in . water, but...
Page 188 - ... acid has the same effect with precipitation of iodine : it reduces gold from its chloride without disengagement of carbonic acid; but it does not reduce mercury from its nitrate or sulphate, as formic acid does. The simplest reagent for purifying common vinegar is recently calcined wood charcoal...
Page 8 - ... 8vo., pp. 480. New York : AS Barnes & Co. The difficulty in getting up an elementary work upon Chemistry, is not. it is well remarked, what to put in, but what to leave out. This difficulty seems to be fully appreciated, not only by the original author, but the American editor. Professor Gregory gives a methodical and scientific arrangement of the products and theories of Organic Chemistry, in the work before us. The American editor has not omitted the latest discoveries, although they are necessarily...
Page 37 - ... radicals. ORGANIC ACIDS. The acids met with in organic chemistry are principally compounds of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen, although some do contain also nitrogen. They are distinguished from inorganic acids by their high atomic weight, and by the action of heat, which decomposes them all. As, in many of them, the oxygen they contain is a multiple by a whole number of the oxygen of the bases which neutralize them, so they are viewed as oxygen acids by those who consider true sulphuric acid to...
Page 286 - IB insoluble in cold water, alcohol, and ether; but when heated with water it is converted into a kind of solution, which, on cooling, forms a stiff semi-opaque jelly. If dried up. this yields a translucent mass, which softens and swells into a jelly with
Page 168 - ... &c. Cane sugar supplies the system with a similar principle, and is readily transformed into glucose or grape-sugar. There are, however, other sugars found in the animal organism, such as lactine, or sugar of milk, which is obtained by evaporating clarified whey. It is thus obtained in the form of hard, white crystals, soluble in 5 or 6 parts of cold and 2 \ of hot water. It is susceptible of the vinous, lactic, and butyric fermentations; and it is well known (says Gregory) that some nations...

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