The History of Violets

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Ugly Duckling Presse, 2010 - Poetry - 87 pages
5 Reviews
Originally published in 1965, The History of Violets (Historial de las violetas) twists the familiar face of a family farm, populating the fields and grounds with gods, monsters, and a whole "foamy army" of extras. Di Giorgio- whom Kent Johnson hails as "one of the most spectacular and strange Latin American poets of the past fifty years"- locks the natural and supernatural in a perilous dance, balancing humor and violence, beauty and danger, simple childhood memory and complex domestic drama. With disarming grace, these poems leave the reader swirling about, among the flowers, where no one is safe. "There's a lot at stake here, namely the opportunity for a new generation of American poets to take di Giorgio as a model for wresting the 'poetry of witness' away from humanism's easy faith in testimony and remembering that the imagination is the organ of compassion." - Farid Matuk

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Review: The History of Violets

User Review  - Brianne - Goodreads

So beautiful. Can't wait to travel to this world again in Diadem. Read full review

Review: The History of Violets

User Review  - Jim Elkins - Goodreads

The first and last of the thirty-five have wonderful last lines. The weaker entries depend on ecstatic nature poetry, which can be wonderful (a tomato is described as "a kidney of rubies") but also ... Read full review

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About the author (2010)

Born in Salto, Uruguay, and raised on her family's farm, Marosa di Giorgio (1932-2004) is one of the most prominent Uruguayan poets of the twentieth century. Di Giorgio began writing in her childhood and published her first book of poems at the age of twenty-two. She then went on to publish a total of fourteen books of poetry, three collections of short stories, and one novel. While some critics have categorized her as a surrealist, she herself denied membershipin any literary movement or school. Although she was relatively unknown outside the Southern Cone during her lifetime, she is now becoming more and more widely read throughout Latin America and Europe. Jeannine Marie Pitas is a teacher, translator and writer from Buffalo, New York. Under the guidance of Uruguayan writers Nidia di Giorgio and Roberto Echavarren, she has translated three of Marosa di Giorgio's books into English: The History of Violets, Magnolia, and The Native Garden is in Flames.

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