The Unitarian Review, Volume 17 (Google eBook)

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Charles Lowe, Henry Wilder Foote, John Hopkins Morison, Henry H. Barber, James De Normandie, Joseph Henry Allen
Unitarian Review, 1882 - Unitarianism
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Page 544 - Is this a dagger which I see before me, The handle toward my hand ? Come, let me clutch thee. I have thee not, and yet I see thee still. Art thou not, fatal vision, sensible To feeling as to sight ? or art thou but A dagger of the mind, a false creation, Proceeding from the heat-oppressed brain ? I see thee yet, in form as palpable As this which now I draw.
Page 409 - But Peter and John answered and said unto them, whether it be right in the sight of God to hearken unto you more than unto God, judge ye ; for we cannot but speak the things which we have seen and heard.
Page 400 - For whosoever shall be ashamed of me and of my words, of him shall the Son of man be ashamed, when he shall come in his own glory, and in his Father's, and of the holy angels.
Page 261 - Brethren, I count not myself to have apprehended : but this one thing I do, forgetting those things which are behind, and reaching forth unto those things which are before, I press toward the mark for the prize of the high calling of God in Christ Jesus.
Page 321 - Hath the LORD as great delight in burnt offerings and sacrifices, As in obeying the voice of the LORD? Behold, to obey is better than sacrifice, And to hearken than the fat of rams.
Page 104 - Our fathers trusted in thee: they trusted, and thou didst deliver them. They cried unto thee, and were delivered: they trusted in thee, and were not confounded.
Page 409 - Now, when they saw the boldness of Peter and John, and perceived that they were unlearned and ignorant men, they marvelled ; and they took knowledge of them, that they had been with Jesus.
Page 407 - This he said, not that he cared for the poor; but because he was a thief, and had the bag, and bare what was put therein.
Page 432 - CROMWELL, our chief of men, who through a cloud Not of war only, but detractions rude, Guided by faith and matchless fortitude, To peace and truth thy glorious way hast ploughed...
Page 323 - Our Friend, our Brother, and our Lord, What may thy service be ? Nor name, nor form, nor ritual word, But simply following thee. We bring no ghastly holocaust, We pile no graven stone ; He serves thee best who loveth most His brothers and thy own. Thy litanies, sweet offices Of love and gratitude ; Thy sacramental liturgies, The joy of doing good.

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