Robert E. Lee, Man and Soldier (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Scribner's Sons, 1911 - United States - 734 pages
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Contents

I
3
II
15
III
36
IV
67
V
80
VI
122
VII
145
VIII
192
XVI
410
XVII
424
XVIII
444
XIX
467
XX
488
XXI
516
XXII
545
XXIII
580

IX
215
X
249
XI
264
XII
292
XIII
304
XIV
364
XV
388
XXIV
617
XXV
636
XXVI
642
XXVII
660
XXVIII
684
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 62 - With all my devotion to the Union, and the feeling of loyalty and duty of an American citizen, I have not been able to make up my mind to raise my hand against my relatives, my children, my home.
Page 264 - I have heard, in such a way as to believe it, of your recently saying that both the army and the government needed a dictator. Of course it was not for this, but in spite of it, that I have given you the command. Only those generals who gain successes can set up dictators What I now ask of you is military success, and I will risk the dictatorship.
Page 574 - ... the officers to give their individual paroles not to take up arms against the Government of the United States until properly exchanged, and each company or regimental commander sign a like parole for the men of their commands. The arms, artillery, and public property to be parked and stacked, and turned over to the officers appointed by me to receive them. This will not embrace the side-arms of the officers, nor their private horses or baggage.
Page 684 - Every man thinks meanly of himself for not having been a soldier, or not having been at sea." BOSWELL. " Lord Mansfield does not." JOHNSON. " Sir, if lord Mansfield were in a company of general officers and admirals who have been in service, he would shrink ; he'd wish to creep under the table.
Page 637 - Yes, I know they will say hard things of us; they will not understand how we were overwhelmed by numbers; but that is not the question, Colonel; the question is, is it right to surrender this army? If it is right, then I will take all the responsibility.
Page 609 - ... He was a foe without hate; a friend without treachery; a soldier without cruelty; a victor without oppression; and a victim without murmuring. He was a public officer without vices; a private citizen without wrong; a neighbor without reproach; a Christian without hypocrisy; and a man without guile. He was Caesar without his ambition; Frederick without his tyranny; Napoleon without his selfishness; and Washington without his reward.
Page 577 - After four years of arduous service marked by unsurpassed courage and fortitude the Army of Northern Virginia has been compelled to yield to overwhelming numbers and resources. I need not tell the survivors of so many hard fought battles who have remained steadfast to the last that I have consented to this result from no distrust of them. But feeling that valor and devotion could accomplish nothing that could compensate for the loss that...
Page 578 - By the terms of the agreement, officers and men can return to their homes and remain until exchanged. You will take with you the satisfaction that proceeds from the consciousness of duty faithfully performed; and I earnestly pray that a Merciful God will extend to you His blessing and protection.
Page 571 - There is nothing left me to do but to go and see General Grant, and I would rather die a thousand deaths.
Page 578 - You will take with you the satisfaction that proceeds from the consciousness of duty faithfully performed; and I earnestly pray that a merciful God will extend to you his blessing and protection. With an increasing admiration of your constancy and devotion to your country, and a grateful remembrance of your kind and generous consideration of myself, I bid you an affectionate farewell. RE LEE, General.

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