Early English Poetry, Ballads, and Popular Literature of the Middle Ages, Volume 29 (Google eBook)

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Percy Society, 1851 - English literature
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Page 67 - ADVENTURES OF ROBINSON CRUSOE , Of YORK. MARINER: Who lived Eight and Twenty Years, all alone in an un-inhabited Island on the Coast of AMERICA, near the Mouth of the Great River of OROONOQUE; Having been cast on Shore by Shipwreck, wherein all the Men perished but himself. WITH An Account how he was at last as strangely deliver'd by PYRATES. Written by Himself.
Page 58 - I'll speed me to the pond, where the high stool On the long plank hangs o'er the muddy pool, That stool, the dread of every scolding quean.
Page 48 - The higher he's a-getting, The sooner will his race be run, And nearer he's to setting. That age is best which is the first, When youth and blood are warmer; But being spent, the worse and worst Times still succeed the former. Then be not coy, but use your time, And while ye may, go marry; For, having lost but...
Page 44 - Could I still dote upon thy face. Not but all joy in thy brown hair By others may be found; But I must search the black and fair Like...
Page ix - I think the Duke of Buckingham is the cause, and till the king be informed thereof, we shall never go out with honour, nor sit with honour here. That man is the grievance of grievances ; let us set down the causes of all our disasters, and they will all reflect upon him.
Page 7 - twas from mine he took desires Enough t' undo the amorous world. From me he took his sighs and tears, From thee his pride and cruelty ; From me his languishments and fears, And every killing dart from thee. Thus thou and I the god have arm'd And set him up a deity ; But my poor heart alone is harm'd, Whilst thine the victor is, and free!
Page 81 - THE WANDERING JEW, OR THE SHOEMAKER OF JERUSALEM, who lived when our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ was crucified, and by Him appointed to wander until he comes again. With his travels, method of living, and a discourse with some clergymen about the end of the world. 12mo. Darlington. Printed by W. Appelton, 1790. This tract, probably, relates to a person, "who made a very hermit-like appearance," seen by Brand, who professed to be the wandering Jew.
Page 57 - Bacon* CONTAINING THE WONDERFUL!.' THINGS THAT HE DID IN HIS LIFE: ALSO THE MANNER OF HIS DEATH; WITH THE LIVES AND DEATHS OF THE TWO CONIUUEltS, BUNOYE AND VANDERMAST. VERY PLEASANT AND DELIGHTFULL TO BE READ.
Page 27 - The Bedlam is in the same garb, with a long staff, and a cow or ox-horn by his side ; but his cloathing is more fantastick and ridiculous ; for, being a madman, he is madly decked and dressed all over with rubins, feathers, cuttings of cloth, and what not ? to make him seem a mad-man, or one distracted, when he is no other than a dissembling knave.
Page 45 - Here Nature nurs'd her darling boy, From whom all care and sorrow fly, Whose harp the muses strung : From heart to heart let joy rebound, Now, now, we tread enchanted ground, Here Shakespeare walk'd and sung ! 1 72.

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