Critical and Exegetical Hand-book to the Gospels of Mark and Luke (Google eBook)

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Funk and Wagnalls, 1884 - Bible - 598 pages
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OCLC: 621325
Related Subjects: Bible. -- N.T. -- Mark -- Commentaries. | Bible. -- N.T. -- Luke -- Commentaries.
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Page 593 - And when they had fulfilled all things that were written of him, they took him down from the tree, and laid him in a tomb. But God raised him from the dead : and he was seen for many days of them that came up with him from Galilee to Jerusalem, who are now his witnesses unto the people.
Page 82 - And when the sabbath was come, he began to teach in the synagogue : and many hearing him were astonished, saying, Whence hath this man these things? and, What is the wisdom that is given unto this man, and what mean such mighty works wrought by his hands? Is not this the carpenter, the son of Mary, and brother of James, and Joses, and Judas, and Simon? and are not his sisters here with us? And they were offended in him.
Page 11 - In substance and style and treatment," it has been well said, "the Gospel of St Mark is essentially a transcript from life. The course and issue of facts are imaged in it with the clearest outline. If all other arguments against the mythic origin of the Evangelic narratives were wanting, this vivid and simple record, stamped with the most distinct impress of independence and originality, totally unconnected with the symbolism of the Old Dispensation, totally independent of the deeper reasonings of...
Page 199 - The two oldest Greek manuscripts, and some other authorities, omit from ver. 9 to the end. Some other authorities have a different ending to the Gospel.
Page 147 - The tree bears two crops, — an early ripe fig, which is crude and without flavor and valueless, and a later fig, which is full of sweetness and flavor, and highly esteemed. All trees bear the first ; only good ones have the second. Now, the tree our Lord saw had not the second, for the time of that had not yet come ; but it had not even the first, for it had nothing but leaves, and the lack of the first was sure evidence that the second would also be wanting.
Page 26 - Jesus was led up of the Spirit into the wilderness, to be tempted of the devil,
Page 199 - ... either was very early lost by the detachment of a leaf or was never written down ; and (2) that a scribe or editor, unwilling to change the words of the text before him or to add words of his own, was willing to furnish the Gospel with what seemed a worthy conclusion by incorporating with it unchanged a narrative of Christ's appearances after the Resurrection which he found in some secondary record then surviving from a preceding generation. If these suppositions are made, the •whole tenour...
Page 125 - ... hostility is a proof of friendship ; in others, the failure to co-operate is the proof of enmity ; and both might occur in the experience of the same person. But in all cases there is either friendship or enmity. The apparently contradictory proverbs suggest the need of discrimination in applying them. The saying in Matthew refers more to inward unity with Christ ; this one to outward conformity with His people. The former may exist independently of the latter, and its existence unites real Christians,...
Page 11 - ... whatever of our synoptic Gospels play, with the history and sayings of Jesus, supposing that he had before him the other two, or one of them. Such an explanation will only be allowable when we are brought absolutely to despair of finding any other. And even then it were better still to say, Non liqiiet. For this explanation involves a moral contradiction. Most of our present critics are so well aware of this, that they have recourse to middle terms.
Page 199 - There is however no difficulty in supposing on the contrary (i) that the true intended continuation of vv. i — 8 either was very early lost by the detachment of a leaf or was never written down ; and (2) that a scribe or editor, unwilling to change the words of the text before him or to add words of his own, was willing to furnish the Gospel with what seemed a worthy conclusion by incorporating with it unchanged a narrative of Christ's appearances after the Resurrection which he found in some secondary...

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