The Divine Pedigree of Man, Or, The Testimony of Evolution and Psychology to the Fatherhood of God (Google eBook)

Front Cover
A. C. McClurg & Company, 1899 - Evolution - 379 pages
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Related books

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 225 - that we should seek God, if haply we " might feel after him, and find him, though he is not far from each one of us: for in him we
Page 247 - Although I did not think much about the existence of a personal God until a considerably later period of my life, I will here give the vague conclusions to which I have been driven. The old argument from design in nature, as given by Paley, which formerly seemed to me so
Page 231 - the innumerable species, genera, and families of organic beings with which the world is peopled have all descended, each within its own class or group, from common parents, and have all been modified in the course of descent.
Page 49 - how, in different places and times, like conditions have led to similar trains of thought, ending in analogous results. That these countless different, and yet allied, phenomena presented by all religions are accidental or factitious, is an untenable supposition. A candid examination of the evidence quite negatives the doctrine maintained by some, that creeds are priestly inventions.
Page 66 - I distinguish them by designating one as the objective mind, and the other as the subjective mind. The objective mind is that of ordinary, waking consciousness. Its media of cognition are the five physical senses. Its highest function is that of reasoning. It is
Page 383 - Paul Pioneer Press. The wonder is that it was not done long ago. Chicago Tribune. For sale by booksellers generally, or will be sent, postpaid, on receipt of the price, by the
Page 297 - the innumerable species, genera, and families of organic beings with which the world is peopled have all descended, each within its own class or group, from common parents.
Page 297 - that all plants and animals, however different they may now be, must, at one time or other, have been connected by direct or indirect intermediate gradations, and that the appearance of isolation presented by various groups of organic beings must be unreal.
Page 163 - It implies only the preservation of such variations as arise and are beneficial to the being under its conditions of life,
Page 297 - are the lineal descendants of those which lived long before the Silurian epoch." 2 " It is an obvious consequence of this theory of descent,

Bibliographic information