Waverley novels. (Abbotsford ed.). (Google eBook)

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Page 6 - If a woman also vow a vow unto the LORD, and bind herself by a bond, being in her father's house in her youth; and her father hear her vow, and her bond wherewith she hath bound her soul, and her father shall hold his peace at her: then all her vows shall stand, and every bond wherewith she hath bound her soul shall stand.
Page 6 - If a man vow a vow unto the Lord, or swear an oath to bind his soul with a bond ; he shall not break his word, he shall do according to all that proceedeth out of his mouth. " If a woman also vow a vow unto the Lord, and bind herself by a bond, being in her father's house in her youth ; " And her father hear her vow, and her bond wherewith she hath bound her soul, and her father shall hold his peace at her : then all her vows shall stand, and...
Page 567 - I see him not,' said Rebecca. ' Foul craven ! ' exclaimed Ivanhoe ; ' does he blench from the helm when the wind blows highest ? ' ' He blenches not ! he blenches not ! ' said Rebecca, ' I see him now ; he leads a body of men close under the outer barrier of the barbican.* They pull down the piles and palisades ; they hew down the barriers with axes. His high black plume floats abroad over the throng, like a raven over the field of the slain. They have made a breach in the barriers they rush...
Page 30 - LOOK not thou on beauty's charming, Sit thou still when kings are arming, Taste not when the wine-cup glistens, Speak not when the people listens, Stop thine ear against the singer, From the red gold keep thy finger, Vacant heart, and hand, and eye, Easy live and quiet die.
Page 389 - Hundreds of broad-headed, shortstemmed, wide-branched oaks, which had witnessed perhaps the stately march of the Roman soldiery, flung their gnarled arms over a thick carpet of the most delicious greensward ; in some places they were intermingled with beeches, hollies, and copsewood of various descriptions, so closely as totally to intercept the level beams of the sinking sun...
Page 388 - IN that pleasant district of merry England which is watered by the river Don, there extended in ancient times a large forest, covering the greater part of the beautiful hills and valleys which lie between Sheffield and the pleasant town of Doncaster.
Page 470 - Thou canst not mend that shot, Locksley," said the Prince with an insulting smile. "I will notch his shaft for him, however," replied Locksley. ' And letting fly his arrow with a little more precaution than before, it lighted right upon that of his competitor, which it split to shivers. The people who stood around were so astonished at his wonderful dexterity, that they could not even give vent to their surprise in their usual clamor. "This must be the devil, and no man of flesh and blood," whispered...
Page 568 - and they press the besieged hard upon the outer wall; some plant ladders, some swarm like bees, and endeavour to ascend upon the shoulders of each other - down go stones, beams, and trunks of trees upon their heads, and as fast as they bear the wounded to the rear, fresh men supply their places in the assault - Great God! hast thou given men thine own image, that it should be thus cruelly defaced by the hands of their brethren!
Page 390 - ... colour, forming a contrast with the overgrown beard upon his cheeks, which was rather of a yellow or amber hue. One part of his dress only remains, but it is too remarkable to be suppressed ; it was a brass ring, resembling a dog's collar, but without any opening, and soldered fast round his neck, so loose as to form no impediment to his breathing, yet so tight as to be incapable of being removed, excepting by the use of the file. On this singular gorget was engraved in Saxon characters an inscription...
Page 567 - And I must lie here like a bedridden monk," exclaimed Ivanhoe, " while the game that gives me freedom or death is played out by the hand of others ! Look from the window once again, kind maiden, but beware that you are not marked by the archers beneath Look out once more, and tell me if they yet advance to the Btorm.

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