Tracing an Indian Diaspora: Contexts, Memories, Representations

Front Cover
Parvati Raghuram
SAGE Publications, Sep 4, 2008 - Social Science - 467 pages
0 Reviews
The Indian diaspora, comprising over 20 million people spread across a hundred countries, continues to grow in size and make its presence felt. This collection traces various forms of plurality within the diaspora: geographical dispersion, historical contexts, temporal frames, authorial positions and political affiliations. It is an assemblage, not a narrative, and purposefully so. It does not attempt to produce a new boundary around diasporic identifications, but rather to unsettle diaspora by loosely juxtaposing a set of chapters that provide complementary, sometimes conflicting perspectives on diasporic locations, identifications and representations.

Some sections of the compilation probe the migratory movements that have led to the formation of the Indian diaspora, unpacking its geographical scope and highlighting its different locales. Others look at diasporic practices, focusing on the ways and means of remembering and enacting diasporic belonging and the sites and spaces where such narratives of belonging are performed.

This work is an invaluable resource for students, researchers and academicians working in the fields of anthropology, geography, history, political science, sociology, Asian studies, diaspora studies, South Asian studies, literary studies, cultural studies, ethnic and migration studies.

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

About the author (2008)

My research interests focus on the ways in which the mobility of individuals, goods and ideas is reshaping the world. Most of the work I have done so far has focused on how people experience and negotiate globalisation, especially as they move as gendered workers in sectors where the 'knowledge' of global knowledge societies is embodied and embedded: sectors such as medicine, education and the IT sector. The mobility and meanings of goods is an area I have explored in my work on Asian women and fashion. In the future I would like to examine how these mobilities are underlain by ideas such as developmentalism in order to explore how they reproduce, alter and challenge gendered subjectivities of migrants. My key concern here is to understand the implications of these ways of thinking for class and race politics and the ways in which postcolonial theory can provide a route into such thinking. Alongside these issues I have also kept up an interest in methodological and epistemological issues.

Bibliographic information