I love myself when I am laughing ... and then again when I am looking mean and impressive: a Zora Neale Hurston reader

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Feminist Press, 1979 - Fiction - 313 pages
20 Reviews
The most prolific African-American woman author from 1920 to 1950, Hurston was praised for her writing and condemned for her independence, arrogance, and audaciousness. This unique anthology, with 14 superb examples of her fiction, journalism, folklore, and autobiography, rightfully establishes her as the intellectual and spiritual leader of the next generation of black writers. In addition to six essays and short stories, the collection includes excerpts from Dust Tracks on the Road; Mules and Me; Tell My Horse; Jonah's Gourd Vine; Moses, Man of the Mountain; and Their Eyes Were Watching God. The original commentary by Alice Walker and Mary Helen Washington, two African-American writers in the forefront of the Hurston revival, provide illuminating insights into Hurston-the writer, the person-as well as into American social and cultural history.

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Review: I Love Myself When I Am Laughing... And Then Again: A Zora Neale Hurston Reader

User Review  - Mariana - Goodreads

I read this book because Alice Walker wrote the prolog and epilog. The author lived an original life. Some of her work written in dialect I find difficult to read. Read full review

Review: I Love Myself When I Am Laughing... And Then Again: A Zora Neale Hurston Reader

User Review  - DrLoni - Goodreads

Zora Neale Hurston is my the author of my favorite book -- Their Eyes Were Watching God. This book read after the latter filled in the craving for more of her work. Read full review

Contents

Dedication By Alice Walker
1
Introduction By Mary Helen Washington
7
Autobiography Folklore and Reportage
26
Copyright

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About the author (1979)

Zora Neale Hurston was born in 1901 in Eatonville, Fla. She left home at the age of 17, finished high school in Baltimore, and went on to study at Howard University, Barnard College, and Columbia University before becoming one of the most prolific writers in the Harlem Renaissance. Her works included novels, essays, plays, and studies in folklore and anthropology. Her most productive years were the 1930s and early 1940s. It was during those years that she wrote her autobiography Dust Tracks on a Road, worked with the Federal Writers Project in Florida, received a Guggenheim fellowship, and wrote four novels. She is most remembered for her novel Their Eyes Were Watching God, published in 1937. She died penniless and in obscurity in 1960 and was buried in an unmarked grave. In 1973, her grave was rediscovered and marked and her novels and autobiography have since been reprinted.

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