The Fannie Farmer Cookbook

Front Cover
Knopf, 1996 - Cooking - 874 pages
33 Reviews
Here is the great basic American cookbook—with more than 1,990 recipes, plain and fancy—that belongs in every household.

Originally published in 1896 as The Boston Cooking-School Cook Book by Fannie Merritt Farmer, it becamethecoobook that taught generations of Americans how to cook. Completely updating it for the first time since 1979, Marion Cunningham made Fannie Farmer once again a household word for a new generation of cooks.

What makes this basic cookbook so distinctive is that Marion Cunningham, who is the personification of the nineteenth-century teacher, is always at your side with her forthright tips and comments, encouraging the beginning cook and inspiring the more adventurous. She knows what today's cooks are looking for, and she has a way of instilling confidence and joy in the act of cooking.

In giving the book new life, Mrs. Cunningham has been careful always to preserve the best of the old. She has retained all the particularly good, tried-and-true recipes from preceding editions, retesting and rewriting when necessary. She has rediscovered lost treasures, including delicious recipes that were eliminated when practically no one baked bread at home. This is now the place to find the finest possible recipes for Pumpkin Soup, Boston Baked Beans, Carpetbag Steak, Roast Stuffed Turkey, Anadama Bread, Indian Pudding, Apple Pie, and all of the other traditional favorites.

The new recipes reflect ethnic influences—Mediterranean, Moroccan, Asian—that have been adding their flavors to American cooking in recent years. Tucked in among all your favorites like Old-Fashioned Beef Stew, New England Clam Chowder, Ham Timbales, and Chicken Jambalaya, you'll find her cool Cucumber Sushi, Enchiladas with Chicken and Green Sauce, or a layered dish of Polenta and Fish to add variety to your repertoire. Always a champion of old-fashioned breakfasts and delectable desserts, Mrs. Cunningham has many splendid new offerings to tempt you.

Throughout, cooking terms and procedures are explained, essential ingredients are spelled out, basic equipment is assessed. Mrs. Cunningham even tells you how to make a good cup of coffee and how to brew tea properly.

For the diet-conscious, there is an expanded nutritional chart that includes a breakdown of cholesterol and fat in common ingredients as well as in Fannie Farmer basic recipes. Where the taste of a dish would not be altered, Mrs. Cunningham has reduced the amount of cream and butter in some of the recipes from the preceding edition. She carefully evaluates the issues of food safety today and alerts us to potential hazards.

But the emphasis here is always on good flavor, fresh ingredients, and lots of variety in one's daily fare, which Marion Cunningham believes is the secret to a healthy diet. Dedicated to the home cooks of America, young and old, this thirteenth edition of the book that won the hearts of Americans more than a century ago invites us all—as did the original Fannie Farmer—to cherish the delights of the family table.
  

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Mary_Books - LibraryThing

I was given one at my bridal shower. My family has had this cookbook in their home for generations. It has great explanations for new cooks and excellant recipes every type of food! Read full review

Review: The Fannie Farmer Cookbook: Anniversary

User Review  - Charlotte Crow - Goodreads

I have been cooking with Fannie Farmer for 50 years. Some great recipes Read full review

All 5 reviews »

Contents

About the Kitchen
3
Appetizers Gt First Courses
48
Soups
74
Fish St Shellfish
104
Meat
151
Poultry Game Birds
220
Outdoor Cooking
257
Sauces Marinades Stuffings
273
Quick Breads
535
Cakes
558
Frostings St Fillings
594
Cookies Cake Squares Bars
608
Pies St Pastries
634
Desserts Sn Dessert Sauces
667
Fruits Fruit Desserts
709
Candies St Confections
744

Sandwiches Pizza Gt Tacos
292
Cereals Rice Beans Gt Pasta
305
Eggs Cheese
338
Some Vegetarian Dishes
358
Vegetables
375
Microwave Cooking
447
Salads
469
Yeast Breads
507
Preserves Pickles Relishes Canned Fruits
762
Frozen Foods
796
Beverages
808
Menus St Table Settings
817
The Makeup of Our Foods
824
Index
837
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

About the author (1996)

Marion Cunningham was born in Southern California and now lives in Walnut Creek. She was responsible for the complete revision of The Fannie Farmer Cookbook and is the author of The Fannie Farmer Baking Book, The Breakfast Book, The Supper Book, and Cooking with Children. She travels frequently throughout the country giving cooking demonstrations, has contributed articles to "Bon Appetit, Food & Wine," and "Gourmet" magazines, and writes a column for the "San Francisco Chronicle" and the "Los Angeles Times.

Diana Wells is the author of "100 Birds and How They Got Their Names" and "100 Flowers and How They Got Their Names", has written for "Friends Journal", and is contributing editor of the journal "Greenprints". Born in Jerusalem, she has lived in England and Italy and holds an honors degree in history from Oxford University. She now lives with her husband on a farm in Pennsylvania.

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