Letters from Head-quarters: Or, The Realities of the War in the Crimea, by an Officer on the Staff (Google eBook)

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J. Murray, 1858 - Crimean War, 1853-1856 - 412 pages
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Page 129 - Lord Raglan wishes the cavalry to advance rapidly to the front, follow the enemy, and try to prevent the enemy carrying away the guns. Troop of Horse Artillery may accompany. French cavalry is on your left.
Page 94 - BANG!" and a shell exploded a few feet from them, to their intense disgust and the discomfiture of their dinner arrangements. On this being repeated a second time, they thought it more prudent to shift their dining-place to a spot less attractive to Russian shot and shell. Sir George Cathcart is all anxiety to assault the town, and, I believe, thinks he could take it with his division alone. I fear he is somewhat rash, and appears to wish to cut out a line of his own. I have thus endeavoured to tell...
Page 417 - PreservationTechnologies A WORLD LEADER IN PAPER PRESERVATION 111 Thomson Park Drive Cranberry Township, PA 16066...
Page 73 - ... one wrung the hand of a friend ; and " God bless you, old fellow so glad to see you all right ! " and like expressions, were heard on every side between brother officers. It was a touching sight to see the meeting between Lord Raglan and Sir Colin Campbell. The latter was on foot, as his horse had been killed in the earlier part of the action. He went up to his Lordship, and, with tears in his eyes, shook hands, saying it was not the first battle-field they had won together, and that now...
Page 168 - ... to Prince Menchikoff by the allied Generals, complaining of the Russian soldiers stabbing our wounded men when lying on the ground unable to defend themselves, as it was alleged that this had been done in numerous instances during the action on the 5th, whenever the Russian troops gained any little advantage over us. The Commanders-in-Chief demanded an explanation, and inquired whether the war was to be carried on in such an inhuman and barbarous manner as would disgrace any civilized nation....
Page 130 - The pace of our cavalry increased every moment, until they went thundering along the valley, making the ground tremble beneath them. The awful slaughter that was going on, from the fire the enemy poured into them, apparently did not check their career. On they went, headlong to the death, disregarding aught but the object of their attack. At length they arrived at the guns, their numbers sadly thinned, but the few that remained made fearful havoc amongst the enemy's artillerymen. Scarce a man escaped,...
Page 107 - ... trenches, lost 2 men killed and 11 wounded. The French loss was about the same, as far as I could ascertain. Our works hardly suffered at all ; here and there a gabion was displaced, but nothing that could not be repaired in the course of a few hours. As an instance of the admirable practice of the Russian artillery, I must tell you that on this day I had to take some orders to Sir George Cathcart. He was walking about a hundred yards in advance of his tent in the open. I rode up to him, and...
Page 356 - We are beginning to recover a little from the "bitter pill" we had to swallow on Monday last (18th), but still every one is more or less out of spirits. Lord Raglan is perhaps the most cheerful of any one, considering how much he has had lately to worry and annoy him : but at the same time, I fear that it has affected his health : he looks far from well, and has grown very much aged latterly.
Page 70 - This magnificent division the flower of the British army had crossed the river rather higher up than the Light Division, and consequently were on its left. The attention of the enemy being chiefly taken up in repelling the attack of Sir George Brown, the 1st Division had formed-up after crossing the Alma ; and although they incurred considerable loss in so doing, they nevertheless advanced in most beautiful order; really as if on parade. I never shall forget that sight one felt so proud...
Page 394 - The Queen has received with deep emotion the welcome intelligence of the fall of Sebastopol. " Penetrated with profound gratitude to the Almighty, who has vouchsafed this triumph to the Allied Army, Her Majesty has commanded me to express to yourself, and through you to the army, the pride with which She regards this fresh instance of their heroism. " The Queen congratulates her troops on the triumphant issue of this protracted siege ; and thanks them for the cheerfulness and fortitude with which...

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