The Protestant "Reformation" Part Second: Containing a List of the Abbeys, Priories, Nunneries, Hospitals, and Other Religious Foundations, in England and Wales, and in Ireland, Confiscated, Seized On, Or Alienated, by the Protestant "Reformation" Sovereigns and Parliaments (Google eBook)

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A. Cobbett, 1853 - Theology - 188 pages
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Page 135 - Joceline goes on then to relate that with this staff our Apostle collected every venemous serpent and snake in the island of Erin to the top of the mountain of Crough Phadruig, or Patrick's Hill, in the county of Mayo, and from thence precipitated them into the ocean. This story was handed down by general tradition in that country since the earliest ages, being related by many authors who flourished prior to the days of Joceline, in the year 1185, This house and possessions were granted 31 Elizabeth,...
Page 134 - Patrick, conversing with them, found that those aged persons were sons of those seemingly young ; astonished at this miraculous appearance, he was told, " that from their infancy they had served God, that they were constantly employed in works of charity, and their doors ever open to...
Page 159 - Saint Louis remitted a third part of all such debts for the salvation of his own soul and the souls of his ancestors ; "et quia pacem operatur justicia," continues the chronicler, naive in morals as in grammar, "dedit Deus sibi pacem et regno tranquillitatem.
Page 134 - In this island there were some men in the bloom of youth, and others who appeared aged and decrepid. St. Patrick, upon conversing with them, found that those persons seemingly old were sons of those who appeared young. He was astonished at this miraculous appearance, until he was told that from their infancy they had served God; that they were constantly employed in works of charity, and their doors ever open to the traveller and the distressed ; and that one night a stranger, with a staff in his...
Page xix - I have shown by a reference to the canon-law, that the poor were to have relief out of the tithes. And, to prove beyond all doubt, that this was the practice as well as the law, I need only mention an Act of the 15th year of Richard...
Page xii - HE should be taught that the laws ' of nature had doomed him and his family to starve...
Page 134 - He then gave this staff to their spiritual father, with directions to deliver it to a stranger named Patrick, who would shortly visit them. On saying this he ascended into heaven, and left us in that state of juvenility in which you behold us, and our sons, then young, are the old decrepid persons you now see.
Page ix - All the monasteries were, in effect, great hospitals, and were, most of them, obliged to relieve many poor people every day. They were, likewise, houses of entertainment for almost all travellers.
Page 134 - Justus, an ascetick, who inhabited an island in the Tyrrhene sea, a man of exemplary virtue and most holy life. After mutual salutations and discourse, he presented the Irish apostle with a staff, which he averred he had received from the hands of Jesus Christ himself. In this island were some men in the bloom of youth, and others who appeared aged and decrepit; St. Patrick, conversing with them, found that these aged persons were the sons of the seemingly young.
Page 15 - Ethelstan, for seven Priests, to pray for the souls of those who were slain in a battle which he fought against the Danes, at Bremaldown, near this place.

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