Deadly Connections: States that Sponsor Terrorism

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Cambridge University Press, Jun 27, 2005 - Political Science
3 Reviews
Thousands of people have died at the hands of terrorist groups who rely on state support for their activities. Iran and Syria are well known as sponsors of terrorism, while other countries, some with strong connections to the West, have enabled terrorist activity by turning a blind eye. Daniel Byman's hard-hitting and articulate book, first published in 2005, analyzes this phenomenon. Focusing primarily on sponsors from the Middle East and South Asia, it examines the different types of support that states provide, their motivations, and the impact of such sponsorship. The book also considers regimes that allow terrorists to raise money and recruit without providing active support. The experiences of Iran, Pakistan, Afghanistan, Syria, Saudi Arabia, and Libya are detailed here, alongside the histories of radical groups such as al-Qaida and Hizballah. The book concludes by assessing why it is often difficult to force sponsors to cut ties to terrorist groups and suggesting ways in which it could be done better in the future.
  

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Deadly Connections: States that Sponsor Terrorism

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Avoiding the sensationalism and politicizing that often accompany books on terrorism, Byman examines terrorist groups from the PLO to Al Qaeda to the Tamil Tigers and explains relationships between ... Read full review

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Terrorism & Invisible Balance of Power
By Imran Farooqi
In his book, “Invisible Balance of Power, US vs Islamic Militants: Dangerous Shift in International Relations”, published in 2005, Sajjad
Shaukat has taken present ‘different war’ as an interaction of ‘state terrorism’ led by the United States and the ‘group terrorism’ by the Al Qaeda or Islamic militants. It is notable that a number of authors have written books about the 9/11 tragedy, but ground realities developed in accordance with the book. After seeing the main title, some people think that the book is against the US or its western allies, but without any prejudice, he has discussed both the sovereign and non-sovereign entities on parallel lines in this research-based book. On the one hand, he has pointed out Al Qaeda’s ambush attacks, targeted killings, beheadings etc., while on the other, he has mentioned special operations by the US forces in Afghanistan and Iraq, and CIA-tortures cells in various Islamic countries. In this regard, missile strikes by the drones on Pakistan’s tribal areas and elsewhere amounts to state terrorism, which are being responded by the internal backlash…suicide attacks and hostage-takings by the Muslim radicals. Shaukat has proved that both the warring parties kill innocent civilians through ruthless terror.
Giving a number of references of the power-theorists like Machiavelli, Hobbes, Morgentahu etc. Shaukat has written that power factor or use of force has failed in this different war which took origin from the privileged and unprivileged status quo led by the most developed states and the less developed countries respectively.
Besides, Shaukat has introduced new ideas about the issues relating to the Islamic ideology, Jehad, liberalism, Western world, terrorism, causes of suicide attacks etc.
Particularly, future observations of the author like a prolonged war, failure of military paradigm by the state actors in coping with the non-state actors, increase in US cost of war, rise of more terrorism, unsuccessful mission of NATO in Afghanistan, plane plot in UK, international financial crisis, warlike situation between America and Iran, Syria and Israel including other developments have proved correct.
Shaukat also gave positive suggestions to the US, but President Obama did not act upon them. Therefore war on terror has resulted into more implications as already predicted by the author. For example, he elaborated that Al Qaeda fighters have been creating economic instability in the world through their subversive acts, giving a blow to the larger economies of the US and the developed nations.
The book indicates that realism (power factor) must be reconciled with idealism, which is essential for world peace and geo-political interests of the US-led developed countries and those of the small countries by reforming the system of the UN.
It is due to the present scenario of war against terrorism—which already pointed out by the author that the publisher reprinted the book after seven years.
Main Title: Invisible Balance of Power
Author: Sajjad Shaukat -ISBN, 9690019589
Published by: Ferozsons, 60 Shahrah-i-Quaid-i-Azam, Lahore, Pakistan
Date of Publication: 2005
Pages: 245
Price: Rs. 495
Reprinted in 2013, Price: Rs. 595
Publisher’s Email: support@ferozsons.com.pk
www.@ferozsons.com.pk
Telephone: 0092 42 35712024
0092 42 35712276
Author’s Email: sajjad_logic@yahoo.com
 

Contents

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1
II
21
III
53
IV
79
V
117
VI
155
VII
187
VIII
219
IX
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X
273
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Page 353 - Zorinsky (D. -Nebraska), chairman of the Subcommittee on Western Hemisphere Affairs of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee declared that in dealing with the area, "the fundamental mistake we make . . . is to back governments or regimes which enjoy little or no popular support.
Page 355 - General shall fully inform the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence and the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence concerning all electronic surveillance under this chapter.

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About the author (2005)

Daniel Byman is Assistant Professor in the Security Program of the Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University. He has published widely on issues related to terrorism, Middle East politics, and national security. He is also a non-resident Senior Fellow at the Saban Center for Middle East Policy at the Brookings Institution and has served on the staff of the '9/11 Commission', among other positions. He is the author of The Dynamics of Coercion: American Foreign Policy and the Limits of Military Might (2002), and Keeping the Peace: Lasting Solutions to Ethnic Conflicts (2002).

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