The life of Samuel Johnson, LL. D.: comprehending an account of his studies and numerous works, in chronological order; a series of his epistolatory correspondence and conversations with many eminent persons; and various original pieces of his composition, never before published: the whole exhibiting a view of literature and literary men in Great-Britain, for near half a century during which he flourished, Volume 2 (Google eBook)

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W. Andrews and L. Blake, 1807 - Literary Criticism
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Page 426 - Why, Sir, you find no man, at all intellectual, who is willing to leave London. No, Sir, when a man is tired of London, he is tired of life ; for there is in London all that life can afford.
Page 166 - The greatest part of a writer's time is spent in reading, in order to write ; a man will turn over half a library to make one book.
Page 444 - He had always been very zealous against slavery in every form, in which I with all deference thought that he discovered " a zeal without knowledge." Upon one occasion, when in company with some very grave men at Oxford, his toast was, " Here's to the next insurrection of the negroes in the West Indies.
Page 369 - tis too late to praise. If want of skill or want of care appear, Forbear to hiss; the poet cannot hear. By all, like him, must praise and blame be found, At last a fleeting gleam, or empty sound.
Page 442 - ... dejection, so that I was ready to shed tears; and of daring resolution, so that I was inclined to rush into the thickest part of the battle. ' Sir, (said he,) I should never hear it, if it made me such a fool.
Page 316 - Many things which are false are transmitted from book to book, and gain credit in the world. One of these is the cry against the evil of luxury. Now the truth, is that luxury produces much good. Take the luxury of buildings in London.
Page 422 - WE were now treading that illustrious Island, which was once the luminary of the Caledonian regions, whence savage clans and roving barbarians derived the benefits of knowledge, and the blessings of religion. To abstract the mind from all local emotion would be impossible, if it were endeavoured, and would be foolish, if it were possible. Whatever withdraws us from the power of our senses, whatever makes the past, the distant, or the future, predominate over the present, advances us in the dignity...
Page 73 - the fable of the little fishes, who saw birds fly over their heads and, envying them, petitioned Jupiter to be changed into birds. The skill," continued ht;, " consists in making them talk like little fishes.
Page 23 - But, Sir, in the British constitution it is surely of importance to keep up a spirit in the people, so as to preserve a balance against the crown." JOHNSON. "Sir, I perceive you are a vile Whig. Why all this childish jealousy of the power of the crown? The crown has not power enough.
Page 437 - I asked whether Prior's poems were to be printed entire ; Johnson said they were. I mentioned Lord Hailes's censure of Prior, in his preface to a collection of " Sacred Poems," by various hands, published by him at Edinburgh a great many years ago, where he mentions " those impure tales which will be the eternal opprobrium of their ingenious author.

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