The War of the End of the World

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Macmillan, Jul 22, 2008 - Fiction - 568 pages
28 Reviews

Deep within the remote backlands of nineteenth-century Brazil lies Canudos, home to all the damned of the earth: prostitutes, bandits, beggars, and every kind of outcast. It is a place where history and civilization have been wiped away. There is no money, no taxation, no marriage, no census. Canudos is a cauldron for the revolutionary spirit in its purest form, a state with all the potential for a true, libertarian paradise--and one the Brazilian government is determined to crush at any cost.

In perhaps his most ambitious and tragic novel, Mario Vargas Llosa tells his own version of the real story of Canudos, inhabiting characters on both sides of the massive, cataclysmic battle between the society and government troops. The resulting novel is a fable of Latin American revolutionary history, an unforgettable story of passion, violence, and the devastation that follows from fanaticism.

  

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Review: The War of the End of the World

User Review  - Jeremy - Goodreads

(3.5) Epic historical fiction of the War of Canudos, which was really a self-defensed massacre of a religious community in Brazil of thirty thousand or more. The waves of developments at times seemed ... Read full review

Review: The War of the End of the World

User Review  - Ali - Goodreads

An extraordinary endeavour. One of the disadvantages of reading an eBook is that there is no sense of heft and quantity. That made me unprepared for the sheer scale of this novel of damnation and ... Read full review

Contents

I
3
II
16
III
33
IV
48
V
68
VI
84
VII
105
VIII
127
XIII
218
XIV
251
XV
284
XVI
312
XVII
353
XVIII
379
XIX
415
XX
456

IX
136
X
141
XI
168
XII
192
XXI
501
XXII
533
Copyright

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About the author (2008)

MARIO VARGAS LLOSA was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature in 2010 “for his cartography of structures of power and his trenchant images of the individual’s resistance, revolt, and defeat.” Peru’s foremost writer, he has been awarded the Cervantes Prize, the Spanish-speaking world’s most distinguished literary honor, and the Jerusalem Prize. His many works include The Feast of the Goat, The Bad Girl, Aunt Julia and the Scriptwriter, The War of the End of the World, and The Storyteller. He lives in London.

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