Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Trans and Queer Psychology: An Introduction (Google eBook)

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Cambridge University Press, Apr 1, 2010 - Psychology
1 Review
This exciting and engaging textbook introduces students to the psychology of lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans and queer lives and experiences. It covers a broad range of topics including diversity, prejudice, health, relationships, parenting and lifespan experiences from youth to old age. The book includes 'key researcher' boxes, which outline the contributions of significant individuals and their motivations for conducting their research in their own words. Key issues and debates are discussed throughout the book, and questions for discussion and classroom exercises help students reflect critically and apply their learning. There are extensive links to further resources and information, as well as 'gaps and absences' sections, indicating major limitations of research in a particular area. This is the essential textbook for anyone studying LGBTQ psychology, psychology of sexuality or related courses. It is also a useful supplement to courses on gender and developmental psychology.
  

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I found Chap 6:Health very helpful for illuminating the multi-issue struggle for LGBTQ people in healthcare settings and with health care professionals. Thanks!

Contents

1 Introducing LGBTQ psychology
3
2 Key debates and perspectives
25
3 Doing LGBTQ psychological research
52
Section II Understanding social marginalisation in LGBTQ lives
79
4 Diversity
81
5 Prejudice and discrimination
103
6 Health
125
Section III LGBTQ experiences across the lifespan
149
9 Parenting and family
194
10 Ageing and old age
216
Section IV Conclusion
239
11 The future of LGBTQ psychology
241
Glossary
257
Additional resources
272
References
278
Index
321

7 Young people coming out and identity development
151
8 Relationships
173

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2010)

Victoria Clarke is a Reader in Sexuality Studies at the University of the West of England, Bristol.

Sonja J. Ellis is a Principal Lecturer in Psychology at Sheffield Hallam University.

Elizabeth Peel is a Senior Lecturer in Psychology at Aston University, Birmingham.

Damien W. Riggs is Visiting Research Fellow in the School of Psychology at the University of Adelaide and Lecturer in the School of Social Work at Flinders University.

Bibliographic information