The History of Don Francisco de Miranda's Attempt to Effect a Revolution in South America, in a Series of Letters (Google eBook)

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Oliver and Munroe, 1808 - Venezuela - 300 pages
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Page 45 - I, AB, do solemnly swear or affirm (as the case may be) that I will bear true allegiance to the United States of America, and that I will serve them honestly and faithfully against all their enemies or opposers whatsoever; and observe and obey the orders of the President of the United States...
Page 59 - I'm thinking, Pierre, how that damned starving quality Called Honesty got footing in the world. Pierr. Why, powerful Villainy first set it up, For its own ease and safety: honest men Are the soft easy cushions on which knaves Repose and fatten...
Page iv - States entitled an act for the encouragement of learning hy securing the copies of maps, charts and books to the author., and proprietors of such copies during the times therein mentioned, and also to an act entitled an act supplementary to an act, entitled an act for the encouragement of learning by securing the copies of maps, charts and books to the authors and proprietors of such copies during the times therein mentioned and extending the benefits thereof to the arts of designing, engraving and...
Page 294 - In general his demeanour is marked by hauteur and distance. When he is angry he loses discretion. He is impatient of contradiction. In discourse he is logical in the management of his thoughts. He appears conversant on all subjects. His iron memory prevents his ever being at a loss for names, dates and authorities.
Page 111 - W rescue his country, and to shed the last drop • of his blood in promoting its happiness : An object, of which he has never lost sight for a moment of his life." " There will be made a liberal distribution of land at the expiration of a twelve month, according to rank ; and privates, from the instant of enrolment, will be entitled to provision and clothing, with a quarter dollar per day as pay, not subject to any deductions.
Page 6 - Americans, some of them gentlemen, and persons of good standing in society, though mostly, I believe, of crooked fortunes, have embarked. Few of us, before entering the ship, saw our leader, but had our communication with those, who were his ac» knowledged agents and advocates.
Page 293 - Upon the whole without sayinghe is an elegant, we may pronounce him a handsome man. He has a constant habit of picking his teeth. When sitting he is never perfectly still ; his foot or hand must be moving to keep time with his mind which is always in exercise. He always sleeps a few moments after dinner, and then walks till bed time, which with him is about midnight. He is an eminent example of temperance. A scanty or bad meal is never regarded by him as a subject of complaint. He uses no ardent...
Page 6 - We know enough not to be angry with ourselves for joining the undertaking ; we imagine and conjecture much. Generally, I can say that we are engaged in an expedition to some part of the Spanish dominions, probably in South America, with a view to assist the inhabitants in throwing off the oppressive yoke of the parent country, and establishing a government for themselves ; upon which, we are told, by our General, they have resolved ; and for which, he says, they are entirely disposed and prepared.
Page 280 - Chili,' of which we conversed at Washington,— and in which you will, perhaps, find more than in those which have been before published on the same subject, concerning this beautiful country. " If ever the happy prediction, which you have pronounced on the future destiny of our dear Columbia, is to be accomplished in our day, may Providence grant that it may be under your auspices, and by the generous efforts of her own children...
Page 15 - Besides, the expedition is now placed on a respectable footing by [638] ^having, as we presume, the acknowledgment and countenance of England. We are all in high spirits and in high hopes. The general now speaks more openly about the enterprise; he expresses great anxiety to begin his operations, and complains of having been so long detained in a good wind, notwithstanding it has turned out so much to the advantage of his project, both on account of the promised assistance, and a certificate that...

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