Prometheus: Archetypal Image of Human Existence

Front Cover
Princeton University Press, 1997 - Literary Criticism - 152 pages
0 Reviews

Prometheus the god stole fire from heaven and bestowed it on humans. In punishment, Zeus chained him to a rock, where an eagle clawed unceasingly at his liver, until Herakles freed him. For the Greeks, the myth of Prometheus's release reflected a primordial law of existence and the fate of humankind. Carl Kerényi examines the story of Prometheus and the very process of mythmaking as a reflection of the archetypal function and seeks to discover how this primitive tale was invested with a universal fatality, first in the Greek imagination, and then in the Western tradition of Romantic poetry. Kerényi traces the evolving myth from Hesiod and Aeschylus, and in its epic treatment by Goethe and Shelley; he moves on to consider the myth from the perspective of Jungian psychology, as the archetype of human daring signifying the transformation of suffering into the mystery of the sacrifice.

  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

III
3
IV
4
V
6
VI
12
VII
15
VIII
19
IX
20
X
22
XXXI
71
XXXII
72
XXXIII
75
XXXIV
77
XXXV
79
XXXVI
83
XXXVII
84
XXXVIII
85

XI
23
XII
27
XIII
30
XIV
33
XV
35
XVI
39
XVII
40
XVIII
42
XIX
44
XX
47
XXI
48
XXII
50
XXIII
53
XXIV
55
XXV
57
XXVI
60
XXVII
63
XXVIII
64
XXIX
67
XXX
69
XXXIX
87
XL
88
XLI
89
XLII
93
XLIII
94
XLIV
96
XLV
99
XLVI
102
XLVII
105
XLVIII
107
XLIX
109
L
112
LI
113
LII
117
LIII
121
LIV
129
LV
134
LVI
135
LVII
147
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »